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Title: Macromolecular crystallography with a large format CMOS detector

Abstract

Recent advances in CMOS technology have allowed the production of large surface area detectors suitable for macromolecular crystallography experiments [1]. The Molecular Biology Consortium (MBC) Beamline 4.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, has installed a 2952 x 2820 mm RDI CMOS-8M detector with funds from NIH grant S10OD012073. The detector has a 20nsec dead pixel time and performs well with shutterless data collection strategies. The sensor obtains sharp point response and minimal optical distortion by use of a thin fiber-optic plate between the phosphor and sensor module. Shutterless data collections produce high-quality redundant datasets that can be obtained in minutes. The fine-sliced data are suitable for processing in standard crystallographic software packages (XDS, HKL2000, D*TREK, MOSFLM). Faster collection times relative to the previous CCD detector have resulted in a record number of datasets collected in a calendar year and de novo phasing experiments have resulted in publications in both Science and Nature [2,3]. The faster collections are due to a combination of the decreased overhead requirements of shutterless collections combined with exposure times that have decreased by over a factor of 2 for images with comparable signal to noise of the NOIR-1 detector. The overall increased productivitymore » has allowed the development of new beamline capabilities and data collection strategies.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Molecular Biology Consortium 12003 S. Pulaski Rd. #166 Alsip, IL 60803 U.S.A (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608367
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; DATASETS; FIBERS; FORMATES; IMAGES; MOLECULAR BIOLOGY; NOISE; PHOSPHORS; PRODUCTIVITY; SENSORS; SURFACE AREA; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Nix, Jay C., E-mail: jcnix@lbl.gov. Macromolecular crystallography with a large format CMOS detector. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952854.
Nix, Jay C., E-mail: jcnix@lbl.gov. Macromolecular crystallography with a large format CMOS detector. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952854.
Nix, Jay C., E-mail: jcnix@lbl.gov. Wed . "Macromolecular crystallography with a large format CMOS detector". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952854.
@article{osti_22608367,
title = {Macromolecular crystallography with a large format CMOS detector},
author = {Nix, Jay C., E-mail: jcnix@lbl.gov},
abstractNote = {Recent advances in CMOS technology have allowed the production of large surface area detectors suitable for macromolecular crystallography experiments [1]. The Molecular Biology Consortium (MBC) Beamline 4.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, has installed a 2952 x 2820 mm RDI CMOS-8M detector with funds from NIH grant S10OD012073. The detector has a 20nsec dead pixel time and performs well with shutterless data collection strategies. The sensor obtains sharp point response and minimal optical distortion by use of a thin fiber-optic plate between the phosphor and sensor module. Shutterless data collections produce high-quality redundant datasets that can be obtained in minutes. The fine-sliced data are suitable for processing in standard crystallographic software packages (XDS, HKL2000, D*TREK, MOSFLM). Faster collection times relative to the previous CCD detector have resulted in a record number of datasets collected in a calendar year and de novo phasing experiments have resulted in publications in both Science and Nature [2,3]. The faster collections are due to a combination of the decreased overhead requirements of shutterless collections combined with exposure times that have decreased by over a factor of 2 for images with comparable signal to noise of the NOIR-1 detector. The overall increased productivity has allowed the development of new beamline capabilities and data collection strategies.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952854},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}