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Title: Alignment and position visualization methods for the biomedical imaging and therapy (BMIT) MRT lift

Abstract

The Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) Lift is an eight stage positioning and scanning system at the Canadian Light Source’s BMIT Facility. Alignment of the sample with the beam using the MRT Lift is a time consuming and challenging task. The BMIT Group has developed a Python-based MRT Lift positioning and control program that uses a combination of computational and iterative methods to independently adjust the sample’s X, Y, Z, pitch and roll positions. The program offers “1-Click” alignment of the sample to the beam. Use of a wireframe visualization technique enables even minute movements to be illustrated. Proposed movements and the resulting MRT Lift position can be manually verified before being applied. Optional integration with the SolidWorks modelling platform allows high quality renderings of the MRT Lift in its current or proposed position to be displayed in real time. Human factors principles are incorporated into the program with the objective of delivering easy to use controls for this complex device.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Canadian Light Source Inc., 44 Innovation Blvd, Saskatoon, SK S7N 2V3 Canada (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608359
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ALIGNMENT; BEAMS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CURRENTS; ELEVATORS; EQUIPMENT; ITERATIVE METHODS; MANUALS; RADIOTHERAPY; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Bree, Michael, E-mail: michael.bree@lightsource.ca, Miller, Denise, Kerr, Graham, Belev, George, Wysokinski, Tomasz W., and Dolton, Wade. Alignment and position visualization methods for the biomedical imaging and therapy (BMIT) MRT lift. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952846.
Bree, Michael, E-mail: michael.bree@lightsource.ca, Miller, Denise, Kerr, Graham, Belev, George, Wysokinski, Tomasz W., & Dolton, Wade. Alignment and position visualization methods for the biomedical imaging and therapy (BMIT) MRT lift. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952846.
Bree, Michael, E-mail: michael.bree@lightsource.ca, Miller, Denise, Kerr, Graham, Belev, George, Wysokinski, Tomasz W., and Dolton, Wade. 2016. "Alignment and position visualization methods for the biomedical imaging and therapy (BMIT) MRT lift". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952846.
@article{osti_22608359,
title = {Alignment and position visualization methods for the biomedical imaging and therapy (BMIT) MRT lift},
author = {Bree, Michael, E-mail: michael.bree@lightsource.ca and Miller, Denise and Kerr, Graham and Belev, George and Wysokinski, Tomasz W. and Dolton, Wade},
abstractNote = {The Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) Lift is an eight stage positioning and scanning system at the Canadian Light Source’s BMIT Facility. Alignment of the sample with the beam using the MRT Lift is a time consuming and challenging task. The BMIT Group has developed a Python-based MRT Lift positioning and control program that uses a combination of computational and iterative methods to independently adjust the sample’s X, Y, Z, pitch and roll positions. The program offers “1-Click” alignment of the sample to the beam. Use of a wireframe visualization technique enables even minute movements to be illustrated. Proposed movements and the resulting MRT Lift position can be manually verified before being applied. Optional integration with the SolidWorks modelling platform allows high quality renderings of the MRT Lift in its current or proposed position to be displayed in real time. Human factors principles are incorporated into the program with the objective of delivering easy to use controls for this complex device.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952846},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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