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Title: Hard x-ray nanoprobe of beamline P06 at PETRA III

Abstract

The hard x-ray scanning microscope at beamline P06 of PETRA III at DESY in Hamburg serves a large user community, from physics, chemistry, and nanotechnology to the bio-medical, materials, environmental, and geosciences. It has been in user operation since 2012, and is mainly based on nanofocusing refractive x-ray lenses. Using refractive optics, nearly gaussian-limited nanobeams in the range from 50 to 100 nm can be generated in the hard x-ray energy range from 8 to 30 keV. The degree of coherence can be traded off against the flux in the nanobeam by a two-stage focusing scheme. We give a brief overview on published results from this instrument and describe its most important components and parameters.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ; ; ; ;  [4]
  1. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)
  2. (Germany)
  3. Institute of Optics and Photonics of Condensed Matter, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09126 Chemnitz (Germany)
  4. Institut für Strukturphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608344
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; DESY; HARD X RADIATION; KEV RANGE; MICROSCOPES; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Schroer, C. G., E-mail: christian.schroer@desy.de, Department Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Baumbach, C., Döhrmann, R., Kahnt, M., Reinhardt, J., Scholz, M., Schropp, A., Seyrich, M., Wittwer, F., Falkenberg, G., Klare, S., Hoppe, R., Patommel, J., Ritter, S., Samberg, D., and Seiboth, F. Hard x-ray nanoprobe of beamline P06 at PETRA III. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952830.
Schroer, C. G., E-mail: christian.schroer@desy.de, Department Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Baumbach, C., Döhrmann, R., Kahnt, M., Reinhardt, J., Scholz, M., Schropp, A., Seyrich, M., Wittwer, F., Falkenberg, G., Klare, S., Hoppe, R., Patommel, J., Ritter, S., Samberg, D., & Seiboth, F. Hard x-ray nanoprobe of beamline P06 at PETRA III. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952830.
Schroer, C. G., E-mail: christian.schroer@desy.de, Department Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg, Baumbach, C., Döhrmann, R., Kahnt, M., Reinhardt, J., Scholz, M., Schropp, A., Seyrich, M., Wittwer, F., Falkenberg, G., Klare, S., Hoppe, R., Patommel, J., Ritter, S., Samberg, D., and Seiboth, F. Wed . "Hard x-ray nanoprobe of beamline P06 at PETRA III". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952830.
@article{osti_22608344,
title = {Hard x-ray nanoprobe of beamline P06 at PETRA III},
author = {Schroer, C. G., E-mail: christian.schroer@desy.de and Department Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg and Baumbach, C. and Döhrmann, R. and Kahnt, M. and Reinhardt, J. and Scholz, M. and Schropp, A. and Seyrich, M. and Wittwer, F. and Falkenberg, G. and Klare, S. and Hoppe, R. and Patommel, J. and Ritter, S. and Samberg, D. and Seiboth, F.},
abstractNote = {The hard x-ray scanning microscope at beamline P06 of PETRA III at DESY in Hamburg serves a large user community, from physics, chemistry, and nanotechnology to the bio-medical, materials, environmental, and geosciences. It has been in user operation since 2012, and is mainly based on nanofocusing refractive x-ray lenses. Using refractive optics, nearly gaussian-limited nanobeams in the range from 50 to 100 nm can be generated in the hard x-ray energy range from 8 to 30 keV. The degree of coherence can be traded off against the flux in the nanobeam by a two-stage focusing scheme. We give a brief overview on published results from this instrument and describe its most important components and parameters.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952830},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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