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Title: Development of the XFP beamline for x-ray footprinting at NSLS-II

Abstract

For over a decade, synchrotron-based footprinting studies at the NSLS X28C beamline have provided unique insights and approaches for examining the solution-state structures of large macromolecular assemblies, membrane proteins, and soluble proteins, for time-resolved studies of macromolecular dynamics, and most recently for in vivo studies of RNA-protein complexes. The transition from NSLS to NSLS-II has provided the opportunity to create an upgraded facility for the study of increasingly complex systems; progress on the development of the XFP (X-ray Footprinting for In Vitro and In Vivo Structural Studies of Biological Macromolecules) beamline at NSLS-II is presented here. The XFP beamline will utilize a focused 3-pole wiggler source to deliver a high flux density x-ray beam, where dynamics can be studied on the microsecond to millisecond timescales appropriate for probing biological macromolecules while minimizing sample perturbation. The beamline optics and diagnostics enable adaptation of the beam size and shape to accommodate a variety of sample morphologies with accurate measurement of the incident beam, and the upgrades in sample handling and environment control will allow study of highly sensitive or unstable samples. The XFP beamline is expected to enhance relevant flux densities more than an order of magnitude from that previously available atmore » X28C, allowing static and time-resolved structural analysis of highly complex samples that have previously pushed the boundaries of x-ray footprinting technology. XFP, located at NSLS-II 17-BM, is anticipated to become available for users in 2016.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Case Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States)
  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608342
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; BEAMS; DISTURBANCES; FLUX DENSITY; MEMBRANE PROTEINS; MEMBRANES; NSLS; PERTURBATION THEORY; RNA; SYNCHROTRONS; TIME RESOLUTION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Bohon, Jen, E-mail: jbohon@bnl.gov, Sullivan, Michael, Abel, Don, Toomey, John, Chance, Mark R., E-mail: mark.chance@case.edu, and Dvorak, Joseph. Development of the XFP beamline for x-ray footprinting at NSLS-II. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952828.
Bohon, Jen, E-mail: jbohon@bnl.gov, Sullivan, Michael, Abel, Don, Toomey, John, Chance, Mark R., E-mail: mark.chance@case.edu, & Dvorak, Joseph. Development of the XFP beamline for x-ray footprinting at NSLS-II. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952828.
Bohon, Jen, E-mail: jbohon@bnl.gov, Sullivan, Michael, Abel, Don, Toomey, John, Chance, Mark R., E-mail: mark.chance@case.edu, and Dvorak, Joseph. Wed . "Development of the XFP beamline for x-ray footprinting at NSLS-II". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952828.
@article{osti_22608342,
title = {Development of the XFP beamline for x-ray footprinting at NSLS-II},
author = {Bohon, Jen, E-mail: jbohon@bnl.gov and Sullivan, Michael and Abel, Don and Toomey, John and Chance, Mark R., E-mail: mark.chance@case.edu and Dvorak, Joseph},
abstractNote = {For over a decade, synchrotron-based footprinting studies at the NSLS X28C beamline have provided unique insights and approaches for examining the solution-state structures of large macromolecular assemblies, membrane proteins, and soluble proteins, for time-resolved studies of macromolecular dynamics, and most recently for in vivo studies of RNA-protein complexes. The transition from NSLS to NSLS-II has provided the opportunity to create an upgraded facility for the study of increasingly complex systems; progress on the development of the XFP (X-ray Footprinting for In Vitro and In Vivo Structural Studies of Biological Macromolecules) beamline at NSLS-II is presented here. The XFP beamline will utilize a focused 3-pole wiggler source to deliver a high flux density x-ray beam, where dynamics can be studied on the microsecond to millisecond timescales appropriate for probing biological macromolecules while minimizing sample perturbation. The beamline optics and diagnostics enable adaptation of the beam size and shape to accommodate a variety of sample morphologies with accurate measurement of the incident beam, and the upgrades in sample handling and environment control will allow study of highly sensitive or unstable samples. The XFP beamline is expected to enhance relevant flux densities more than an order of magnitude from that previously available at X28C, allowing static and time-resolved structural analysis of highly complex samples that have previously pushed the boundaries of x-ray footprinting technology. XFP, located at NSLS-II 17-BM, is anticipated to become available for users in 2016.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952828},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}