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Title: Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression

Abstract

In this experiment we studied oncologic safety of model implants created using the solution blow spinning method with the use of the PURASORB PL-38 polylactic acid polymer and organic mineral filler which was obtained via laser ablation of a solid target made of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate. For this purpose the implant was introduced into the area of Wistar rats’ iliums, and on day 17 after the surgery the Walker sarcoma was transplanted into the area of the implant. We evaluated the implant’s influence on the primary tumor growth, hematogenous and lymphogenous metastasis of the Walker sarcoma. In comparison with sham operated animals the implant group demonstrated significant inhibition of hematogenous metastasis on day 34 after the surgery. The metastasis inhibition index (MII) equaled 94% and the metastases growth inhibition index (MGII) equaled 83%. The metastasis frequency of the Walker sarcoma in para aortic lymph nodes in the implant group was not statistically different from the control frequency; there was also no influence of the implant on the primary tumor growth noted. In case of the Walker sarcoma transplantation into the calf and the palmar pad of the ipsilateral limb to the one with the implant in the ilium, wemore » could not note any attraction of tumor cells to the implant area, i.e. stimulation of the Walker sarcoma relapse by the implant. Thus, the research concluded that the studied implant meets the requirements of oncologic safety.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]; ;  [1];  [1];  [2];  [4]
  1. Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)
  2. (Russian Federation)
  3. National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)
  4. National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608282
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1760; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: PC'16: International conference on physics of cancer: Interdisciplinary problems and clinical applications 2016, Tomsk (Russian Federation), 22-25 Mar 2016; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ABLATION; CALCIUM; CALCIUM PHOSPHATES; HYDRATES; IMPLANTS; LASER RADIATION; LIMBS; LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; METASTASES; POLYMERS; RATS; SARCOMAS; SOLIDS; STIMULATION; SURGERY; TRANSPLANTS; TUMOR CELLS

Citation Formats

Litviakov, N. V., E-mail: nvlitv72@yandex.ru, Tsyganov, M. M., E-mail: TsyganovMM@yandex.ru, Cherdyntseva, N. V., E-mail: nvch@oncology.tomsk.ru, National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050, Tverdokhlebov, S. I., E-mail: tverd@tpu.ru, Bolbasov, E. N., E-mail: ebolbasov@gmail.com, Perelmuter, V. M., E-mail: pvm@ngs.ru, Kulbakin, D. E., E-mail: kulbakin2012@gmail.com, Zheravin, A. A., E-mail: zheravin2010@yandex.ru, Academician E.N. Meshalkin Novosibirsk State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk, and Svetlichnyi, V. A., E-mail: v-svetlichnyi@bk.ru. Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960262.
Litviakov, N. V., E-mail: nvlitv72@yandex.ru, Tsyganov, M. M., E-mail: TsyganovMM@yandex.ru, Cherdyntseva, N. V., E-mail: nvch@oncology.tomsk.ru, National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050, Tverdokhlebov, S. I., E-mail: tverd@tpu.ru, Bolbasov, E. N., E-mail: ebolbasov@gmail.com, Perelmuter, V. M., E-mail: pvm@ngs.ru, Kulbakin, D. E., E-mail: kulbakin2012@gmail.com, Zheravin, A. A., E-mail: zheravin2010@yandex.ru, Academician E.N. Meshalkin Novosibirsk State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk, & Svetlichnyi, V. A., E-mail: v-svetlichnyi@bk.ru. Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960262.
Litviakov, N. V., E-mail: nvlitv72@yandex.ru, Tsyganov, M. M., E-mail: TsyganovMM@yandex.ru, Cherdyntseva, N. V., E-mail: nvch@oncology.tomsk.ru, National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050, Tverdokhlebov, S. I., E-mail: tverd@tpu.ru, Bolbasov, E. N., E-mail: ebolbasov@gmail.com, Perelmuter, V. M., E-mail: pvm@ngs.ru, Kulbakin, D. E., E-mail: kulbakin2012@gmail.com, Zheravin, A. A., E-mail: zheravin2010@yandex.ru, Academician E.N. Meshalkin Novosibirsk State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk, and Svetlichnyi, V. A., E-mail: v-svetlichnyi@bk.ru. Tue . "Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960262.
@article{osti_22608282,
title = {Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression},
author = {Litviakov, N. V., E-mail: nvlitv72@yandex.ru and Tsyganov, M. M., E-mail: TsyganovMM@yandex.ru and Cherdyntseva, N. V., E-mail: nvch@oncology.tomsk.ru and National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 and Tverdokhlebov, S. I., E-mail: tverd@tpu.ru and Bolbasov, E. N., E-mail: ebolbasov@gmail.com and Perelmuter, V. M., E-mail: pvm@ngs.ru and Kulbakin, D. E., E-mail: kulbakin2012@gmail.com and Zheravin, A. A., E-mail: zheravin2010@yandex.ru and Academician E.N. Meshalkin Novosibirsk State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk and Svetlichnyi, V. A., E-mail: v-svetlichnyi@bk.ru},
abstractNote = {In this experiment we studied oncologic safety of model implants created using the solution blow spinning method with the use of the PURASORB PL-38 polylactic acid polymer and organic mineral filler which was obtained via laser ablation of a solid target made of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate. For this purpose the implant was introduced into the area of Wistar rats’ iliums, and on day 17 after the surgery the Walker sarcoma was transplanted into the area of the implant. We evaluated the implant’s influence on the primary tumor growth, hematogenous and lymphogenous metastasis of the Walker sarcoma. In comparison with sham operated animals the implant group demonstrated significant inhibition of hematogenous metastasis on day 34 after the surgery. The metastasis inhibition index (MII) equaled 94% and the metastases growth inhibition index (MGII) equaled 83%. The metastasis frequency of the Walker sarcoma in para aortic lymph nodes in the implant group was not statistically different from the control frequency; there was also no influence of the implant on the primary tumor growth noted. In case of the Walker sarcoma transplantation into the calf and the palmar pad of the ipsilateral limb to the one with the implant in the ilium, we could not note any attraction of tumor cells to the implant area, i.e. stimulation of the Walker sarcoma relapse by the implant. Thus, the research concluded that the studied implant meets the requirements of oncologic safety.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960262},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1760,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 02 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Aug 02 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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