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Title: High temperature x-ray micro-tomography

Abstract

There is increasing demand for 3D micro-scale time-resolved imaging of samples in realistic - and in many cases extreme environments. The data is used to understand material response, validate and refine computational models which, in turn, can be used to reduce development time for new materials and processes. Here we present the results of high temperature experiments carried out at the x-ray micro-tomography beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The themes involve material failure and processing at temperatures up to 1750°C. The experimental configurations required to achieve the requisite conditions for imaging are described, with examples of ceramic matrix composites, spacecraft ablative heat shields and nuclear reactor core Gilsocarbon graphite.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]; ;  [4];  [5];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [6];  [1];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. University California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara CA 93106 (United States)
  4. NASA Ames Research Centre, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 (United States)
  5. University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)
  6. University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TH (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22608257
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1741; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI2015: 12. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, New York, NY (United States), 6-10 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE; CERAMICS; GRAPHITE; HEAT; IMAGES; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; TIME RESOLUTION; TOMOGRAPHY; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

MacDowell, Alastair A., E-mail: aamacdowell@lbl.gov, Barnard, Harold, Parkinson, Dilworth Y., Gludovatz, Bernd, Haboub, Abdel, current –Lincoln Univ., Jefferson City, Missouri, 65101, Larson, Natalie, Zok, Frank, Panerai, Francesco, Mansour, Nagi N., Bale, Hrishikesh, current - Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, 4385 Hopyard Rd #100, Pleasanton, CA 94588, Acevedo, Claire, University California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, Liu, Dong, Ritchie, Robert O., and University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720. High temperature x-ray micro-tomography. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4952925.
MacDowell, Alastair A., E-mail: aamacdowell@lbl.gov, Barnard, Harold, Parkinson, Dilworth Y., Gludovatz, Bernd, Haboub, Abdel, current –Lincoln Univ., Jefferson City, Missouri, 65101, Larson, Natalie, Zok, Frank, Panerai, Francesco, Mansour, Nagi N., Bale, Hrishikesh, current - Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, 4385 Hopyard Rd #100, Pleasanton, CA 94588, Acevedo, Claire, University California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, Liu, Dong, Ritchie, Robert O., & University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720. High temperature x-ray micro-tomography. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952925.
MacDowell, Alastair A., E-mail: aamacdowell@lbl.gov, Barnard, Harold, Parkinson, Dilworth Y., Gludovatz, Bernd, Haboub, Abdel, current –Lincoln Univ., Jefferson City, Missouri, 65101, Larson, Natalie, Zok, Frank, Panerai, Francesco, Mansour, Nagi N., Bale, Hrishikesh, current - Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, 4385 Hopyard Rd #100, Pleasanton, CA 94588, Acevedo, Claire, University California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, Liu, Dong, Ritchie, Robert O., and University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720. Wed . "High temperature x-ray micro-tomography". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4952925.
@article{osti_22608257,
title = {High temperature x-ray micro-tomography},
author = {MacDowell, Alastair A., E-mail: aamacdowell@lbl.gov and Barnard, Harold and Parkinson, Dilworth Y. and Gludovatz, Bernd and Haboub, Abdel and current –Lincoln Univ., Jefferson City, Missouri, 65101 and Larson, Natalie and Zok, Frank and Panerai, Francesco and Mansour, Nagi N. and Bale, Hrishikesh and current - Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, 4385 Hopyard Rd #100, Pleasanton, CA 94588 and Acevedo, Claire and University California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 and Liu, Dong and Ritchie, Robert O. and University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720},
abstractNote = {There is increasing demand for 3D micro-scale time-resolved imaging of samples in realistic - and in many cases extreme environments. The data is used to understand material response, validate and refine computational models which, in turn, can be used to reduce development time for new materials and processes. Here we present the results of high temperature experiments carried out at the x-ray micro-tomography beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The themes involve material failure and processing at temperatures up to 1750°C. The experimental configurations required to achieve the requisite conditions for imaging are described, with examples of ceramic matrix composites, spacecraft ablative heat shields and nuclear reactor core Gilsocarbon graphite.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4952925},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1741,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jul 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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