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Title: Loss of Dok-1 and Dok-2 in mice causes severe experimental colitis accompanied by reduced expression of IL-17A and IL-22

Abstract

Appropriate immune responses and mucosal barrier functions are required for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. Defects in this defense system may lead to inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. Downstream of tyrosine kinases 1 (Dok-1) and its closest homolog, Dok-2, are preferentially expressed in immune cells, and play essential roles in the negative regulation of multiple signaling pathways in both innate and adaptive immunity. However, the function of these proteins in intestinal homeostasis remained unclear. Here we show that Dok-1/-2 double knockout (DKO) mice were highly susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis compared with Dok-1 or Dok-2 single KO and wild type (WT) mice. Furthermore, DSS-treated Dok-1/-2 DKO mice exhibited increased colonic tissue damage accompanied by reduced proliferation of the epithelial cells relative to WT controls, suggesting that Dok-1/-2 DKO mice have defects in the repair of intestinal epithelial lesions. In addition, the levels of the Th17 cytokines IL-17A and IL-22, which have protective roles in DSS-induced colitis, were reduced in DSS-treated Dok-1/-2 DKO mice compared with WT mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Dok-1 and Dok-2 negatively regulate intestinal inflammation, apparently through the induction of IL-17A and IL-22 expression. - Highlights: • Dok-1 and Dok-2 playmore » a cooperative role in protection against DSS-induced colitis. • Dok-1/-2 double KO (DKO) mice show extensive ulceration of the colon after DSS treatment. • Proliferation of colonic epithelium is inhibited in DSS-treated Dok-1/-2 DKO mice. • Expression of IL-17A and IL-22 is reduced in the colon of DSS-treated Dok-1/-2 DKO mice.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Division of Genetics, Department of Cancer Biology, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639 (Japan)
  2. Laboratory of Systems Biology, Center for Experimental Medicine and Systems Biology, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639 (Japan)
  3. (PRESTO), Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, 332-0012 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22606208
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 478; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CELL PROLIFERATION; DEXTRAN; EPITHELIUM; HOMEOSTASIS; INFLAMMATION; KNOCK-OUT REACTIONS; LARGE INTESTINE; LYMPHOKINES; MICE; PHOSPHOTRANSFERASES; SODIUM SULFATES; TYROSINE

Citation Formats

Waseda, Masazumi, Arimura, Sumimasa, Shimura, Eri, Nakae, Susumu, Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology, and Yamanashi, Yuji, E-mail: yyamanas@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp. Loss of Dok-1 and Dok-2 in mice causes severe experimental colitis accompanied by reduced expression of IL-17A and IL-22. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.07.079.
Waseda, Masazumi, Arimura, Sumimasa, Shimura, Eri, Nakae, Susumu, Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology, & Yamanashi, Yuji, E-mail: yyamanas@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp. Loss of Dok-1 and Dok-2 in mice causes severe experimental colitis accompanied by reduced expression of IL-17A and IL-22. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.07.079.
Waseda, Masazumi, Arimura, Sumimasa, Shimura, Eri, Nakae, Susumu, Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology, and Yamanashi, Yuji, E-mail: yyamanas@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp. Fri . "Loss of Dok-1 and Dok-2 in mice causes severe experimental colitis accompanied by reduced expression of IL-17A and IL-22". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.07.079.
@article{osti_22606208,
title = {Loss of Dok-1 and Dok-2 in mice causes severe experimental colitis accompanied by reduced expression of IL-17A and IL-22},
author = {Waseda, Masazumi and Arimura, Sumimasa and Shimura, Eri and Nakae, Susumu and Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology and Yamanashi, Yuji, E-mail: yyamanas@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {Appropriate immune responses and mucosal barrier functions are required for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. Defects in this defense system may lead to inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. Downstream of tyrosine kinases 1 (Dok-1) and its closest homolog, Dok-2, are preferentially expressed in immune cells, and play essential roles in the negative regulation of multiple signaling pathways in both innate and adaptive immunity. However, the function of these proteins in intestinal homeostasis remained unclear. Here we show that Dok-1/-2 double knockout (DKO) mice were highly susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis compared with Dok-1 or Dok-2 single KO and wild type (WT) mice. Furthermore, DSS-treated Dok-1/-2 DKO mice exhibited increased colonic tissue damage accompanied by reduced proliferation of the epithelial cells relative to WT controls, suggesting that Dok-1/-2 DKO mice have defects in the repair of intestinal epithelial lesions. In addition, the levels of the Th17 cytokines IL-17A and IL-22, which have protective roles in DSS-induced colitis, were reduced in DSS-treated Dok-1/-2 DKO mice compared with WT mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Dok-1 and Dok-2 negatively regulate intestinal inflammation, apparently through the induction of IL-17A and IL-22 expression. - Highlights: • Dok-1 and Dok-2 play a cooperative role in protection against DSS-induced colitis. • Dok-1/-2 double KO (DKO) mice show extensive ulceration of the colon after DSS treatment. • Proliferation of colonic epithelium is inhibited in DSS-treated Dok-1/-2 DKO mice. • Expression of IL-17A and IL-22 is reduced in the colon of DSS-treated Dok-1/-2 DKO mice.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.07.079},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 478,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 09 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Sep 09 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Highlights: {yields} Reduced p21 expression in senescent cells treated with DNA damaging agents. {yields} Increase of [{sup 3}H]thymidine and BrdU incorporations in DNA damaged-senescent cells. {yields} Upregulation of miR-93 expression in senescent cells in response to DSB. {yields} Failure of p53 binding to p21 promoter in senescent cells in response to DSB. {yields} Molecular mechanism of increased cancer development in aged than young individuals. -- Abstract: To answer what is a critical event for higher incidence of tumor development in old than young individuals, primary culture of human diploid fibroblasts were employed and DNA damage was induced by doxorubicin ormore » X-ray irradiation. Response to the damage was different between young and old cells; loss of p21{sup sdi1} expression in spite of p53{sup S15} activation in old cells along with [{sup 3}H]thymidine and BrdU incorporation, but not in young cells. The phenomenon was confirmed by other tissue fibroblasts obtained from different donor ages. Induction of miR-93 expression and reduced p53 binding to p21 gene promoter account for loss of p21{sup sdi1} expression in senescent cells after DNA damage, suggesting a mechanism of in vivo carcinogenesis in aged tissue without repair arrest.« less
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammation caused by hyperactivated effector immune cells that produce pro-inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have shown that the cannabinoid system may play a critical role in mediating protection against intestinal inflammation. However, the effect of cannabinoid receptor induction after chronic colitis progression has not been investigated. Here, we investigate the effect of cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) agonist, JWH-133, after chronic colitis in IL-10{sup −/−} mice. JWH-133 effectively attenuated the overall clinical score, and reversed colitis-associated pathogenesis and decrease in body weight in IL-10{sup −/−} mice. After JWH-133 treatment, the percentage of CD4{sup +} Tmore » cells, neutrophils, mast cells, natural killer (NK1.1) cells, and activated T cells declined in the intestinal lamina propria (LP) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of mice with chronic colitis. JWH-133 was also effective in ameliorating dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. In this model, JWH-133 reduced the number and percentage of macrophages and IFN-γ expressing cells that were induced during colitis progression. Treatment with aminoalkylindole 6-iodo-pravadoline (AM630), a CB2 receptor antagonist, reversed the colitis protection provided by JWH-133 treatment. Also, activated T cells were found to undergo apoptosis following JWH-133 treatment both in-vivo and in-vitro. These findings suggest that JWH-133 mediates its effect through CB2 receptors, and ameliorates chronic colitis by inducing apoptosis in activated T cells, reducing the numbers of activated T cells, and suppressing induction of mast cells, NK cells, and neutrophils at sites of inflammation in the LP. These results support the idea that the CB2 receptor agonists may serve as a therapeutic modality against IBD. -- Highlights: ► JWH-133, a cannnabinoid receptor-2 agonist ameliorates experimental colitis. ► JWH-133 suppressed inflammation and toxicity to colon by inducing T cell apoptosis. ► JWH-133 decreased mast cells, macrophages, NK cells, IFN-γ{sup +} cells in the LPL. ► AM630, a cannnabinoid receptor-2 antagonist inverted the colitis defense of JWH-133. ► Cannnabinoid receptor-2 may serve as a novel therapeutic target for IBD.« less
  • In addition to its antimicrobial activity, minocycline exerts anti-inflammatory effects in several disease models. However, whether minocycline affects the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease has not been determined. We investigated the effects of minocycline on experimental colitis and its underlying mechanisms. Acute and chronic colitis were induced in mice by treatment with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), and the effect of minocycline on colonic injury was assessed clinically and histologically. Prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of mice with minocycline significantly diminished mortality rate and attenuated the severity of DSS-induced acute colitis. Mechanistically, minocycline administration suppressed inducible nitricmore » oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitrotyrosine production, inhibited proinflammatory cytokine expression, repressed the elevated mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2, 3, 9, and 13, diminished the apoptotic index in colonic tissues, and inhibited nitric oxide production in the serum of mice with DSS-induced acute colitis. In DSS-induced chronic colitis, minocycline treatment also reduced body weight loss, improved colonic histology, and blocked expression of iNOS, proinflammatory cytokines, and MMPs from colonic tissues. Similarly, minocycline could ameliorate the severity of TNBS-induced acute colitis in mice by decreasing mortality rate and inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine expression in colonic tissues. These results demonstrate that minocycline protects mice against DSS- and TNBS-induced colitis, probably via inhibition of iNOS and MMP expression in intestinal tissues. Therefore, minocycline is a potential remedy for human inflammatory bowel diseases.« less
  • Spleen cells from BALB/c mice treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and from normal, unirradiated mice were compared in the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR). Although the percentage of CD4+ cells in the spleen was close to normal, 4 to 6 weeks after TLI, the MLR of unfractionated spleen cells from irradiated mice was more than 10-fold lower than controls. A similar reduction was observed when purified CD4+ cells were used as responders in the MLR. Secretion of IL-2 by cells from irradiated mice was also about 10-fold lower than controls. However, the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells which expressedmore » IL-2 surface receptors during the MLR was similar using spleen cells from irradiated and control mice. Addition of an exogenous source of IL-2 restored the proliferative capacity of the irradiated cells and suggests that the lack of IL-2 secretion is the likely explanation of the marked deficit in the MLR of CD4+ spleen cells after TLI.« less
  • Administration of IL-1 and stem cell factor (SCF) to mice 18 h before lethal {sup 60}Co whole-body irradiation resulted in synergistic radioprotection, as evidenced by increased numbers of mice surviving 1,200 to 1,300 cGy doses of radiation and the recovery of increased numbers of c-kit{sup +} bone marrow cells at 1 and 4 days after the lethal dose of 950 cGy. Anti-SCF Ab inhibited IL-1-induced radioprotection, indicating that endogenous production of SCF is necessary for radioprotection by IL-1. Conversely, radioprotection induced by SCF was reduced by anti-IL-1R Ab, indicating that endogenous IL-1 contributes to SCF radioprotection. SCF, unlike IL-1, doesmore » not induce hemopoietic CSFs and IL-6 or gene expression of a scavenging mitochondrial enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase in the bone marrow, suggesting that SCF and IL-1 radioprotect by distinct pathways. The mRNA expression for c-kit (by Northern blot analysis) and {sup 125}I-SCF binding on bone marrow cells was elevated within 2 and 4 h of IL-1 administration respectively. Four days after LD 100/30 radiation the recovery of c-kit{sup +} bone marrow cells was increased sixfold in IL-1-treated mice, almost 20-fold in SCF-treated mice, and 40-fold in mice treated with the combination of the two cytokines. Thus, endogenous production of both IL-1 and SCF is required for resistance to lethal irradiation and the synergistic radioprotective effect of the two cytokines may, in part, depend on IL-1 and SCF-induced increases in numbers of c-kit{sup +} hemopoietic stem and progenitors cells that survive lethal irradiation. 37 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.« less