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Title: Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds

Abstract

In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young’s modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique,more » the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/collagen was fabricated using 3D printing. • Physical characterization and Cell compatibility were compared. • 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. Tianjin First Center Hospital, No. 24 Fukang Road, Tianjin, TJ 300192 (China)
  2. Institute of Medical Equipment, Academy of Military and Medical Sciences, No. 106, Wandong Street, Hedong District, Tianjin 300000 (China)
  3. Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, No. 154 Anshan Road, Tianjin, TJ 300052 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22606201
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 477; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ABSORPTION; CARTILAGE; CELL PROLIFERATION; COLLAGEN; ELECTRON SCANNING; LYOPHILIZATION; METABOLISM; MORPHOLOGY; PERFORMANCE; POROSITY; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; STEM CELLS

Citation Formats

Sun, Kai, Li, Ruixin, Jiang, Wenxue, E-mail: jiangortholivea@sina.cn, Sun, Yufu, and Li, Hui. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.07.050.
Sun, Kai, Li, Ruixin, Jiang, Wenxue, E-mail: jiangortholivea@sina.cn, Sun, Yufu, & Li, Hui. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.07.050.
Sun, Kai, Li, Ruixin, Jiang, Wenxue, E-mail: jiangortholivea@sina.cn, Sun, Yufu, and Li, Hui. 2016. "Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.07.050.
@article{osti_22606201,
title = {Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds},
author = {Sun, Kai and Li, Ruixin and Jiang, Wenxue, E-mail: jiangortholivea@sina.cn and Sun, Yufu and Li, Hui},
abstractNote = {In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young’s modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/collagen was fabricated using 3D printing. • Physical characterization and Cell compatibility were compared. • 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.07.050},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 477,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
  • To define the advantages and disadvantages of various rendering techniques to obtain three-dimensional (3D) displays of intrahepatic venous structures with helical CT data. After rapid preprocessing segmentation of the liver, helical CT data (8 mm slice thickness overlapped every 4 mm) from 10 patients were reconstructed using maximum intensity projection (MIP), volume rendering, and surface rendering algorithms. Three-dimensional imaging was evaluated blindly and independently by three observers for presence of artifacts and overall quality. Three-dimensional displays showed the hepatic veins and fifth order portal branches with the volume and MIP rendering techniques. Best overall quality in the 3D representation ofmore » the liver was achieved with the MIP technique (p < 0.05). Small details in venous anatomy and portal involvement by tumor were better imaged with the MIP technique. {open_quotes}Stair-step{close_quotes} artifacts markedly degraded the 3D displays obtained with the surface rendering technique, making it inappropriate for imaging the intrahepatic venous structures. Maximum intensity projection appears to be an adequate technique to perform 3D imaging of intrahepatic venous structures with helical CT data when 8 mm slice thicknesses overlapping every 4 mm are used. However, optimization of imaging protocols needs to be done and compared in a larger series. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.« less
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  • The rationale for choosing the freeze-fracture freeze-drying (FFFD) method of biological bulk specimen preparation as well as the theoretical and practical problems of this method are treated. FFFD specimens are suitable for quantitative X-ray microanalysis of biologically relevant elements. Although the spatial resolution of this analytical technique is low, the application of properly selected bulk standard crystals as well as the measurement of the intracellular water and dry mass content by means of another method developed in the same laboratory, allow us to obtain useful information about the age-dependent changes of ionic composition in the main intracellular compartments. The papermore » summarizes the problems with regard to specimen preparation, beam penetration and the quantitative analysis of FFFD specimens. The method has been applied so far mainly for the analysis of intranuclear and intracytoplasmic concentrations of Na, C1 and K in various types of cells and has resulted in a significant contribution to our understanding of the cellular mechanisms of aging. 84 references.« less
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