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Title: In vivo inhibition of tumor progression by 5 hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (juglone) and 2-(4-hydroxyanilino)-1,4-naphthoquinone (Q7) in combination with ascorbate

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to obtain further in vivo data of antitumor effects and mechanisms triggered by juglone and Q7 in combination with ascorbate. The study was done using Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice. Treatments were intraperitoneal every 24 h for 9 days. Control group was treated with excipient. Previous tests selected the doses of juglone and Q7 plus ascorbate (1 and 100 mg/kg, respectively). Samples of ascitic fluid were collected to evaluate carbonyl proteins, GSH and activity of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α, GLUT1, proteins driving cell cycle (p53, p16 and cyclin A) and apoptosis (poly-ADP-polymerase PARP, Bax and Bcl-xL) were assessed by western blot. Tumor cells were categorized by the phase of cell cycle using flow cytometry and type of cell death using acridine orange/ethidium bromide. A glucose uptake assessment was performed by liquid scintillation using Ehrlich tumor cells cultured with {sup 14}C-deoxyglucose. Treatments caused increased protein carbonylation and activity of antioxidant enzymes and decreased levels of GSH, HIF-1α, GLUT1 and glucose uptake in tumor cells. They also caused increased number of tumor cells in G1, p53 and p16 activation and decreased cyclin A, but only when combined withmore » ascorbate. Apoptosis was induced mostly when treatments were done with ascorbate, causing PARP and Bax cleavage, and increased Bax/Bcl-xL ratio. Juglone and Q7 in combination with ascorbate caused inhibition of tumor progress in vivo by triggering apoptosis and cell cycle arrest associated with oxidative stress, suppression of HIF-1 and uncoupling of glycolytic metabolism. - Highlights: • Ascorbate potentiates the inhibition caused by juglone and Q7on tumor progress in vivo. • Juglone and Q7 with ascorbate caused widespread oxidative stress in tumor tissue. • Treatments inhibited HIF-1 and GLUT1 expression causing reduced glucose uptake. • Treatments induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor in vivo.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ;  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Department of Biochemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)
  2. Postgraduate Programe of Health Science, Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina (UNISUL), Palhoça, SC (Brazil)
  3. Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universidad Arturo Prat, Iquique (Chile)
  4. Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group (GTOX), Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22606181
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 477; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ACRIDINE ORANGE; ADP; ANIMAL TISSUES; ANTIOXIDANTS; APOPTOSIS; ASCITES; BORON CHLORIDES; BROMIDES; CARBON 14; CARBONYLATION; CATALASE; CELL CULTURES; CELL CYCLE; EHRLICH ASCITES TUMOR; GLUCOSE; GLUTATHIONE; IN VIVO; INHIBITION; LIQUIDS; MICE; OXIDATION; SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE; TUMOR CELLS; UPTAKE

Citation Formats

Ourique, Fabiana, Kviecinski, Maicon R., Zirbel, Guilherme, Castro, Luiza S.E.P.W., Gomes Castro, Allisson Jhonatan, Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina, Valderrama, Jaime A., Rios, David, Benites, Julio, Calderon, Pedro Buc, and Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi, E-mail: rozangelapedrosa@gmail.com. In vivo inhibition of tumor progression by 5 hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (juglone) and 2-(4-hydroxyanilino)-1,4-naphthoquinone (Q7) in combination with ascorbate. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.06.113.
Ourique, Fabiana, Kviecinski, Maicon R., Zirbel, Guilherme, Castro, Luiza S.E.P.W., Gomes Castro, Allisson Jhonatan, Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina, Valderrama, Jaime A., Rios, David, Benites, Julio, Calderon, Pedro Buc, & Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi, E-mail: rozangelapedrosa@gmail.com. In vivo inhibition of tumor progression by 5 hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (juglone) and 2-(4-hydroxyanilino)-1,4-naphthoquinone (Q7) in combination with ascorbate. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.06.113.
Ourique, Fabiana, Kviecinski, Maicon R., Zirbel, Guilherme, Castro, Luiza S.E.P.W., Gomes Castro, Allisson Jhonatan, Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina, Valderrama, Jaime A., Rios, David, Benites, Julio, Calderon, Pedro Buc, and Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi, E-mail: rozangelapedrosa@gmail.com. Fri . "In vivo inhibition of tumor progression by 5 hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (juglone) and 2-(4-hydroxyanilino)-1,4-naphthoquinone (Q7) in combination with ascorbate". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.06.113.
@article{osti_22606181,
title = {In vivo inhibition of tumor progression by 5 hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (juglone) and 2-(4-hydroxyanilino)-1,4-naphthoquinone (Q7) in combination with ascorbate},
author = {Ourique, Fabiana and Kviecinski, Maicon R. and Zirbel, Guilherme and Castro, Luiza S.E.P.W. and Gomes Castro, Allisson Jhonatan and Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina and Valderrama, Jaime A. and Rios, David and Benites, Julio and Calderon, Pedro Buc and Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi, E-mail: rozangelapedrosa@gmail.com},
abstractNote = {The purpose of the study was to obtain further in vivo data of antitumor effects and mechanisms triggered by juglone and Q7 in combination with ascorbate. The study was done using Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice. Treatments were intraperitoneal every 24 h for 9 days. Control group was treated with excipient. Previous tests selected the doses of juglone and Q7 plus ascorbate (1 and 100 mg/kg, respectively). Samples of ascitic fluid were collected to evaluate carbonyl proteins, GSH and activity of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α, GLUT1, proteins driving cell cycle (p53, p16 and cyclin A) and apoptosis (poly-ADP-polymerase PARP, Bax and Bcl-xL) were assessed by western blot. Tumor cells were categorized by the phase of cell cycle using flow cytometry and type of cell death using acridine orange/ethidium bromide. A glucose uptake assessment was performed by liquid scintillation using Ehrlich tumor cells cultured with {sup 14}C-deoxyglucose. Treatments caused increased protein carbonylation and activity of antioxidant enzymes and decreased levels of GSH, HIF-1α, GLUT1 and glucose uptake in tumor cells. They also caused increased number of tumor cells in G1, p53 and p16 activation and decreased cyclin A, but only when combined with ascorbate. Apoptosis was induced mostly when treatments were done with ascorbate, causing PARP and Bax cleavage, and increased Bax/Bcl-xL ratio. Juglone and Q7 in combination with ascorbate caused inhibition of tumor progress in vivo by triggering apoptosis and cell cycle arrest associated with oxidative stress, suppression of HIF-1 and uncoupling of glycolytic metabolism. - Highlights: • Ascorbate potentiates the inhibition caused by juglone and Q7on tumor progress in vivo. • Juglone and Q7 with ascorbate caused widespread oxidative stress in tumor tissue. • Treatments inhibited HIF-1 and GLUT1 expression causing reduced glucose uptake. • Treatments induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor in vivo.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.06.113},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 477,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 02 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Sep 02 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • N{sup 4}-Hydroxy-dCMP (N{sup 4}-OH-dCMP), N{sup 4}-methoxy-dCMP (N{sup 4}-OMe-dCMP), and their 5-fluoro congeners were all slow-binding inhibitors of Ehrlich carcinoma thymidylate synthase (TS), competitive with respect to dUMP, and had differing kinetic constants describing interactions with the two TS binding sites. N{sup 4}-OH-dCMP was not a substrate and its inactivation of TS was methylenetetrahydrofolate-dependent, hence mechanism-based. K{sub i} values for N{sup 4}-OH-dCMP and its 5-fluoro analogue were in the range 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}8} M, 2-3 orders of magnitude higher for the corresponding N{sup 4}-OMe analogues. The 5-methyl analogue of N{sup 4}-OHdCMP was 10{sup 4}-fold less potent, pointing to the anti rotamermore » of the imino form of exocyclic N{sup 4}-OH, relative to the ring N(3), as the active species. This is consistent with weaker slow-binding inhibition of the altered enzyme from 5-FdUrd-resistant, relative to parent, L1210 cells by both FdUMP and N{sup 4}-OH-dCMP, suggesting interaction of both N{sup 4}-OH and C(5)-F groups with the same region of the active center. Kinetic studies with purified enzyme from five sources, viz., Ehrlich carcinoma, L1210 parental, and 5-FdUrd-resistant cells, regenerating rat liver, and the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta, demonstrated that addition of a 5-fluoro substituent to N{sup 4}-OH-dCMP increased its affinity from 2- to 20-fold for the enzyme from different sources. With the Ehrlich and tapeworm enzymes, N{sup 4}-OH-FdCMP and FdUMP were almost equally effective inhibitors.« less
  • The interaction of formate with the triplet states of naphthoquinone (NQ), anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), benzophenone-4-carboxylate (BC), and benzophenone-4-sulfonate (BS) was studied by laser flash photolysis. Rate constants were determined either by direct measurement of triplet lifetimes or by inhibition of product yields by competitive reactants. Radical products are formed in two stages, direct reduction by formate and efficient secondary reduction by initially formed CO{sub 2}{sup {sm bullet}{minus}} radicals. The quinones react by electron transfer with quenching rate constants k{sub q}(NQ) = 3 {times} 10{sup 9} and k{sub q}(AQS) = 4 {times} 10{sup 8} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, giving anion radicals withmore » primary yields of {phi}{sub R}(NQ) {approximately} 0.7 and {phi}{sub R}(AQS) {approximately} 0.3. Formic acid quenches {sup 3}AQS much more slowly. The less strongly oxidizing ketone triplets react by H-atom abstraction, k{sub q}(BC) = 1.3 {times} 10{sup 7} and k{sub q}(BS) = 5.3 {times} 10{sup 7} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, giving protonated ketyl radicals with primary yields {phi}{sub R} {approximately} 0.7. Photoreduction of BC exhibits a deuterium isotope effect, k{sub H}/k{sub D} = 1.6, whereas AQS shows none. A new, short-lived transient, E, is observed in the {sup 3}AQS-formate reaction, which may be an exciplex or adduct. The redox potential, E{degree}{prime}(NQ/NQ{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}) = {minus}0.12 V, and rate constants for radical reactions of NQ and O{sub 2} were measured by pulse radiolysis. The results are discussed in terms of pertinent redox potentials, bond strengths, and the nature of the exciplex intermediates.« less
  • 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) and acrolein (ACR) are highly reactive neurotoxic products of lipid peroxidation that are implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Conjugation with glutathione (GSH) initiates the 4HNE and ACR detoxification pathway, which generates the mercapturates of 4HNE and ACR that can be excreted. Prior work has shown that the efficiency of the GSH-dependent renal detoxification of haloalkene derived mercapturates is significantly decreased upon their deacetylation because of rapid transformation of the deacetylated products into toxic compounds mediated by β-lyase. The enzymes of the GSH-conjugation pathway and β-lyases are expressed in the brain, and wemore » hypothesized that a similar toxicity mechanism may be initiated in the brain by the deacetylation of 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. The present study was performed to identify an enzyme(s) involved in 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate deacetylation, characterize the brain expression of this enzyme and determine whether its inhibition decreases 4HNE and 4HNE-mercapturate neurotoxicity. We demonstrated that of two candidate deacetylases, aminoacylases 1 (AA1) and 3 (AA3), only AA3 efficiently deacetylates both 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. AA3 was further localized to neurons and blood vessels. Using a small molecule screen we generated high-affinity AA3 inhibitors. Two of them completely protected rat brain cortex neurons expressing AA3 from the toxicity of 4HNE-mercapturate. 4HNE-cysteine (4HNE-Cys) was also neurotoxic and its toxicity was mostly prevented by a β-lyase inhibitor, aminooxyacetate. The results suggest that the AA3 mediated deacetylation of 4HNE-mercapturate may be involved in the neurotoxicity of 4HNE.« less