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Title: Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas

Abstract

Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdownmore » of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)
  2. (China)
  3. Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)
  4. Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22606137
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 476; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; APOPTOSIS; BRAIN; CELL CYCLE; CELL PROLIFERATION; GLIOMAS; MITOSIS; PARAFFIN; PATIENTS

Citation Formats

Zhu, Jun, Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, Cai, Yu, E-mail: aihaozuqiu22@163.com, Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, Liu, Pin, and Zhao, Weiguo. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.05.156.
Zhu, Jun, Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, Cai, Yu, E-mail: aihaozuqiu22@163.com, Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, Liu, Pin, & Zhao, Weiguo. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.05.156.
Zhu, Jun, Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, Cai, Yu, E-mail: aihaozuqiu22@163.com, Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, Liu, Pin, and Zhao, Weiguo. 2016. "Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.05.156.
@article{osti_22606137,
title = {Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas},
author = {Zhu, Jun and Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai and Cai, Yu, E-mail: aihaozuqiu22@163.com and Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai and Liu, Pin and Zhao, Weiguo},
abstractNote = {Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.05.156},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 476,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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