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Title: Reduction of furnace temperature in ultra long carbon nanotube growth by plasmonic excitation of electron Fermi gas of catalytic nanocluster

Abstract

In this paper, a novel physical method is presented to reduce the temperature of the furnace and prevent loss of thermal energy in ultra long carbon nanotube (CNT) growth process by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. This method is based on the plasmonic excitation of electron Fermi gas of catalytic nanocluster sitting at tip end of CNT by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Physical concepts of the method are explained in detail. The results of applying the presented method consequences to an appropriate tip-growth mechanism of the ultra long CNTs show that, in the presence of plasmonic excitation, the growth rate of the CNT is enhanced. Demonstration of temperature reduction and simultaneous increase in CNT length by UV irradiation with the proper frequency are the most important and practical result of the paper. All results are interpreted and discussed.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Shahed University, P.O. Box 18155/159, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22600144
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; CARBON NANOTUBES; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; ELECTRONS; EXCITATION; FERMI GAS; FURNACES; IRRADIATION; LENGTH; REDUCTION; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

Citation Formats

Saeidi, Mohammadreza, E-mail: Saeidi.mr@gmail.com, E-mail: m.saeidi@shahed.ac.ir. Reduction of furnace temperature in ultra long carbon nanotube growth by plasmonic excitation of electron Fermi gas of catalytic nanocluster. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4953096.
Saeidi, Mohammadreza, E-mail: Saeidi.mr@gmail.com, E-mail: m.saeidi@shahed.ac.ir. Reduction of furnace temperature in ultra long carbon nanotube growth by plasmonic excitation of electron Fermi gas of catalytic nanocluster. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953096.
Saeidi, Mohammadreza, E-mail: Saeidi.mr@gmail.com, E-mail: m.saeidi@shahed.ac.ir. 2016. "Reduction of furnace temperature in ultra long carbon nanotube growth by plasmonic excitation of electron Fermi gas of catalytic nanocluster". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953096.
@article{osti_22600144,
title = {Reduction of furnace temperature in ultra long carbon nanotube growth by plasmonic excitation of electron Fermi gas of catalytic nanocluster},
author = {Saeidi, Mohammadreza, E-mail: Saeidi.mr@gmail.com, E-mail: m.saeidi@shahed.ac.ir},
abstractNote = {In this paper, a novel physical method is presented to reduce the temperature of the furnace and prevent loss of thermal energy in ultra long carbon nanotube (CNT) growth process by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. This method is based on the plasmonic excitation of electron Fermi gas of catalytic nanocluster sitting at tip end of CNT by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Physical concepts of the method are explained in detail. The results of applying the presented method consequences to an appropriate tip-growth mechanism of the ultra long CNTs show that, in the presence of plasmonic excitation, the growth rate of the CNT is enhanced. Demonstration of temperature reduction and simultaneous increase in CNT length by UV irradiation with the proper frequency are the most important and practical result of the paper. All results are interpreted and discussed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4953096},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 6,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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