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Title: Charged particle tracking through electrostatic wire meshes using the finite element method

Abstract

Wire meshes are used across many disciplines to accelerate and focus charged particles, however, analytical solutions are non-exact and few codes exist which simulate the exact fields around a mesh with physical sizes. A tracking code based in Matlab-Simulink using field maps generated using finite element software has been developed which tracks electrons or ions through electrostatic wire meshes. The fields around such a geometry are presented as an analytical expression using several basic assumptions, however, it is apparent that computational calculations are required to obtain realistic values of electric potential and fields, particularly when multiple wire meshes are deployed. The tracking code is flexible in that any quantitatively describable particle distribution can be used for both electrons and ions as well as other benefits such as ease of export to other programs for analysis. The code is made freely available and physical examples are highlighted where this code could be beneficial for different applications.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom)
  2. (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22600137
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ANALYTICAL SOLUTION; DISTRIBUTION; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRONS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; GEOMETRY; IONS; M CODES; PARTICLE TRACKS; PARTICLES; S CODES; WIRES

Citation Formats

Devlin, L. J., Karamyshev, O., Welsch, C. P., E-mail: carsten.welsch@cockcroft.ac.uk, and Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool. Charged particle tracking through electrostatic wire meshes using the finite element method. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4953801.
Devlin, L. J., Karamyshev, O., Welsch, C. P., E-mail: carsten.welsch@cockcroft.ac.uk, & Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool. Charged particle tracking through electrostatic wire meshes using the finite element method. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953801.
Devlin, L. J., Karamyshev, O., Welsch, C. P., E-mail: carsten.welsch@cockcroft.ac.uk, and Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool. 2016. "Charged particle tracking through electrostatic wire meshes using the finite element method". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953801.
@article{osti_22600137,
title = {Charged particle tracking through electrostatic wire meshes using the finite element method},
author = {Devlin, L. J. and Karamyshev, O. and Welsch, C. P., E-mail: carsten.welsch@cockcroft.ac.uk and Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool},
abstractNote = {Wire meshes are used across many disciplines to accelerate and focus charged particles, however, analytical solutions are non-exact and few codes exist which simulate the exact fields around a mesh with physical sizes. A tracking code based in Matlab-Simulink using field maps generated using finite element software has been developed which tracks electrons or ions through electrostatic wire meshes. The fields around such a geometry are presented as an analytical expression using several basic assumptions, however, it is apparent that computational calculations are required to obtain realistic values of electric potential and fields, particularly when multiple wire meshes are deployed. The tracking code is flexible in that any quantitatively describable particle distribution can be used for both electrons and ions as well as other benefits such as ease of export to other programs for analysis. The code is made freely available and physical examples are highlighted where this code could be beneficial for different applications.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4953801},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 6,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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