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Title: An inexpensive technique for the time resolved laser induced plasma spectroscopy

Abstract

We present an efficient and inexpensive method for calculating the time resolved emission spectrum from the time integrated spectrum by monitoring the time evolution of neutral and singly ionized species in the laser produced plasma. To validate our assertion of extracting time resolved information from the time integrated spectrum, the time evolution data of the Cu II line at 481.29 nm and the molecular bands of AlO in the wavelength region (450–550 nm) have been studied. The plasma parameters were also estimated from the time resolved and time integrated spectra. A comparison of the results clearly reveals that the time resolved information about the plasma parameters can be extracted from the spectra registered with a time integrated spectrograph. Our proposed method will make the laser induced plasma spectroscopy robust and a low cost technique which is attractive for industry and environmental monitoring.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22599981
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; EMISSION SPECTRA; LASER-PRODUCED PLASMA; LASERS; MONITORING; SPECTROSCOPY; TIME RESOLUTION; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Ahmed, Rizwan, E-mail: rizwan.ahmed@ncp.edu.pk, Ahmed, Nasar, Iqbal, J., and Aslam Baig, M. An inexpensive technique for the time resolved laser induced plasma spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4959866.
Ahmed, Rizwan, E-mail: rizwan.ahmed@ncp.edu.pk, Ahmed, Nasar, Iqbal, J., & Aslam Baig, M. An inexpensive technique for the time resolved laser induced plasma spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959866.
Ahmed, Rizwan, E-mail: rizwan.ahmed@ncp.edu.pk, Ahmed, Nasar, Iqbal, J., and Aslam Baig, M. 2016. "An inexpensive technique for the time resolved laser induced plasma spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959866.
@article{osti_22599981,
title = {An inexpensive technique for the time resolved laser induced plasma spectroscopy},
author = {Ahmed, Rizwan, E-mail: rizwan.ahmed@ncp.edu.pk and Ahmed, Nasar and Iqbal, J. and Aslam Baig, M.},
abstractNote = {We present an efficient and inexpensive method for calculating the time resolved emission spectrum from the time integrated spectrum by monitoring the time evolution of neutral and singly ionized species in the laser produced plasma. To validate our assertion of extracting time resolved information from the time integrated spectrum, the time evolution data of the Cu II line at 481.29 nm and the molecular bands of AlO in the wavelength region (450–550 nm) have been studied. The plasma parameters were also estimated from the time resolved and time integrated spectra. A comparison of the results clearly reveals that the time resolved information about the plasma parameters can be extracted from the spectra registered with a time integrated spectrograph. Our proposed method will make the laser induced plasma spectroscopy robust and a low cost technique which is attractive for industry and environmental monitoring.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4959866},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 8,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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