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Title: Pulsating jet-like structures in magnetized plasma

Abstract

The formation of pulsating jet-like structures has been studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic model of a magnetized plasma with horizontally nonuniform density. We discuss two mechanisms which are capable of stopping the gravitational spreading appearing to grace the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and to lead to the formation of stationary or oscillating localized structures. One of them is caused by the Coriolis effect in the rotating frames, and another is connected with the Lorentz effect for magnetized fluids. Magnetized jets/drops with a positive buoyancy must oscillate in transversal size and can manifest themselves as “radio pulsars.” The estimates of their frequencies are made for conditions typical for the neutron star's ocean.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS, 109017 Moscow (Russian Federation)
  2. UFR des Mathématiques Pures et Appliquées, Univ. Lille, CNRS FRE 3723 - LML, F-59000 Lille (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22599885
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CORIOLIS FORCE; DENSITY; FLUIDS; JETS; LORENTZ GAS; NEUTRON STARS; NEUTRONS; PLASMA; PULSARS; RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY

Citation Formats

Goncharov, V. P., and Pavlov, V. I. Pulsating jet-like structures in magnetized plasma. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960980.
Goncharov, V. P., & Pavlov, V. I. Pulsating jet-like structures in magnetized plasma. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960980.
Goncharov, V. P., and Pavlov, V. I. 2016. "Pulsating jet-like structures in magnetized plasma". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960980.
@article{osti_22599885,
title = {Pulsating jet-like structures in magnetized plasma},
author = {Goncharov, V. P. and Pavlov, V. I.},
abstractNote = {The formation of pulsating jet-like structures has been studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic model of a magnetized plasma with horizontally nonuniform density. We discuss two mechanisms which are capable of stopping the gravitational spreading appearing to grace the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and to lead to the formation of stationary or oscillating localized structures. One of them is caused by the Coriolis effect in the rotating frames, and another is connected with the Lorentz effect for magnetized fluids. Magnetized jets/drops with a positive buoyancy must oscillate in transversal size and can manifest themselves as “radio pulsars.” The estimates of their frequencies are made for conditions typical for the neutron star's ocean.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960980},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 8,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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