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Title: Nanoscale patterns produced by self-sputtering of solid surfaces: The effect of ion implantation

Abstract

A theory of the effect that ion implantation has on the patterns produced by ion bombardment of solid surfaces is introduced. For simplicity, the case of self-sputtering of an elemental material is studied. We find that implantation of self-ions has a destabilizing effect along the projected beam direction for angles of incidence θ that exceed a critical value. In the transverse direction, ion implantation has a stabilizing influence for all θ.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)
  2. II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22598905
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 120; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; INCIDENCE ANGLE; ION BEAMS; ION IMPLANTATION; IONS; NANOSTRUCTURES; SOLIDS; SPUTTERING; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Bradley, R. Mark, and Hofsäss, Hans. Nanoscale patterns produced by self-sputtering of solid surfaces: The effect of ion implantation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960807.
Bradley, R. Mark, & Hofsäss, Hans. Nanoscale patterns produced by self-sputtering of solid surfaces: The effect of ion implantation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960807.
Bradley, R. Mark, and Hofsäss, Hans. 2016. "Nanoscale patterns produced by self-sputtering of solid surfaces: The effect of ion implantation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960807.
@article{osti_22598905,
title = {Nanoscale patterns produced by self-sputtering of solid surfaces: The effect of ion implantation},
author = {Bradley, R. Mark and Hofsäss, Hans},
abstractNote = {A theory of the effect that ion implantation has on the patterns produced by ion bombardment of solid surfaces is introduced. For simplicity, the case of self-sputtering of an elemental material is studied. We find that implantation of self-ions has a destabilizing effect along the projected beam direction for angles of incidence θ that exceed a critical value. In the transverse direction, ion implantation has a stabilizing influence for all θ.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960807},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 7,
volume = 120,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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