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Title: Confined states in photonic-magnonic crystals with complex unit cell

Abstract

We have investigated multifunctional periodic structures in which electromagnetic waves and spin waves can be confined in the same areas. Such simultaneous localization of both sorts of excitations can potentially enhance the interaction between electromagnetic waves and spin waves. The system we considered has a form of one dimensional photonic-magnonic crystal with two types of magnetic layers (thicker and thinner ones) separated by sections of the dielectric photonic crystals. We focused on the electromagnetic defect modes localized in the magnetic layers (areas where spin waves can be excited) and decaying in the sections of conventional (nonmagnetic) photonic crystals. We showed how the change of relative thickness of two types of the magnetic layers can influence on the spectrum of spin waves and electromagnetic defect modes, both localized in magnetic parts of the system.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [3];  [4]; ;  [5]
  1. Ulyanovsk State University, 432000 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)
  2. (Russian Federation)
  3. (Ukraine)
  4. Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine)
  5. Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22598860
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 120; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CRYSTALS; DECAY; DEFECTS; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; EXCITATION; LAYERS; ONE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; PERIODICITY; SPECTRA; SPIN; SPIN WAVES; THICKNESS

Citation Formats

Dadoenkova, Yu. S., Novgorod State University, 173003 Veliky Novgorod, Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk, Dadoenkova, N. N., Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk, Lyubchanskii, I. L., Kłos, J. W., and Krawczyk, M. Confined states in photonic-magnonic crystals with complex unit cell. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4961326.
Dadoenkova, Yu. S., Novgorod State University, 173003 Veliky Novgorod, Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk, Dadoenkova, N. N., Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk, Lyubchanskii, I. L., Kłos, J. W., & Krawczyk, M. Confined states in photonic-magnonic crystals with complex unit cell. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961326.
Dadoenkova, Yu. S., Novgorod State University, 173003 Veliky Novgorod, Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk, Dadoenkova, N. N., Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk, Lyubchanskii, I. L., Kłos, J. W., and Krawczyk, M. 2016. "Confined states in photonic-magnonic crystals with complex unit cell". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961326.
@article{osti_22598860,
title = {Confined states in photonic-magnonic crystals with complex unit cell},
author = {Dadoenkova, Yu. S. and Novgorod State University, 173003 Veliky Novgorod and Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk and Dadoenkova, N. N. and Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk and Lyubchanskii, I. L. and Kłos, J. W. and Krawczyk, M.},
abstractNote = {We have investigated multifunctional periodic structures in which electromagnetic waves and spin waves can be confined in the same areas. Such simultaneous localization of both sorts of excitations can potentially enhance the interaction between electromagnetic waves and spin waves. The system we considered has a form of one dimensional photonic-magnonic crystal with two types of magnetic layers (thicker and thinner ones) separated by sections of the dielectric photonic crystals. We focused on the electromagnetic defect modes localized in the magnetic layers (areas where spin waves can be excited) and decaying in the sections of conventional (nonmagnetic) photonic crystals. We showed how the change of relative thickness of two types of the magnetic layers can influence on the spectrum of spin waves and electromagnetic defect modes, both localized in magnetic parts of the system.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4961326},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 7,
volume = 120,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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