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Title: Auger generation as an intrinsic limit to tunneling field-effect transistor performance

Abstract

Many in the microelectronics field view tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) as society's best hope for achieving a >10× power reduction for electronic devices; however, despite a decade of considerable worldwide research, experimental TFET results have significantly underperformed simulations and conventional MOSFETs. To explain the discrepancy between TFET experiments and simulations, we investigate the parasitic leakage current due to Auger generation, an intrinsic mechanism that cannot be mitigated with improved material quality or better device processing. We expose the intrinsic link between the Auger and band-to-band tunneling rates, highlighting the difficulty of increasing one without the other. From this link, we show that Auger generation imposes a fundamental limit on ultimate TFET performance.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)
  2. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)
  3. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)
  4. IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)
  5. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22598837
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 120; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; LEAKAGE CURRENT; MICROELECTRONICS; MOSFET; PERFORMANCE; SIMULATION; TUNNEL EFFECT

Citation Formats

Teherani, James T., E-mail: j.teherani@columbia.edu, Agarwal, Sapan, Chern, Winston, Antoniadis, Dimitri A., Solomon, Paul M., and Yablonovitch, Eli. Auger generation as an intrinsic limit to tunneling field-effect transistor performance. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960571.
Teherani, James T., E-mail: j.teherani@columbia.edu, Agarwal, Sapan, Chern, Winston, Antoniadis, Dimitri A., Solomon, Paul M., & Yablonovitch, Eli. Auger generation as an intrinsic limit to tunneling field-effect transistor performance. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960571.
Teherani, James T., E-mail: j.teherani@columbia.edu, Agarwal, Sapan, Chern, Winston, Antoniadis, Dimitri A., Solomon, Paul M., and Yablonovitch, Eli. 2016. "Auger generation as an intrinsic limit to tunneling field-effect transistor performance". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960571.
@article{osti_22598837,
title = {Auger generation as an intrinsic limit to tunneling field-effect transistor performance},
author = {Teherani, James T., E-mail: j.teherani@columbia.edu and Agarwal, Sapan and Chern, Winston and Antoniadis, Dimitri A. and Solomon, Paul M. and Yablonovitch, Eli},
abstractNote = {Many in the microelectronics field view tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) as society's best hope for achieving a >10× power reduction for electronic devices; however, despite a decade of considerable worldwide research, experimental TFET results have significantly underperformed simulations and conventional MOSFETs. To explain the discrepancy between TFET experiments and simulations, we investigate the parasitic leakage current due to Auger generation, an intrinsic mechanism that cannot be mitigated with improved material quality or better device processing. We expose the intrinsic link between the Auger and band-to-band tunneling rates, highlighting the difficulty of increasing one without the other. From this link, we show that Auger generation imposes a fundamental limit on ultimate TFET performance.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960571},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 8,
volume = 120,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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