skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide

Abstract

Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22598825
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data; Journal Volume: 45; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: (c) 2016 AIP Publishing LLC for the National Institute of Standards and Technology; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CROSS SECTIONS; ELASTIC SCATTERING; ELECTRON ATTACHMENT; ELECTRON COLLISIONS; ELECTRONS; EXCITATION; IONIZATION; MOMENTUM TRANSFER; NITRIC OXIDE

Citation Formats

Itikawa, Yukikazu, E-mail: yukitikawa@nifty.com. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4961372.
Itikawa, Yukikazu, E-mail: yukitikawa@nifty.com. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961372.
Itikawa, Yukikazu, E-mail: yukitikawa@nifty.com. Thu . "Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961372.
@article{osti_22598825,
title = {Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide},
author = {Itikawa, Yukikazu, E-mail: yukitikawa@nifty.com},
abstractNote = {Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4961372},
journal = {Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data},
number = 3,
volume = 45,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Low-energy ({ital E}{sub 0}=15{endash}40 eV), high-energy-resolution, electron-energy-loss spectra of nitric oxide (NO) have been measured and spectrally deconvolved. This process yielded direct absolute differential cross sections (DCS) for electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of the NO molecule. Integration of these DCS gives integral cross sections (ICS), which confirm earlier estimates that the magnitudes of the NO ICS are one to two orders smaller than the analogous transitions in N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. In this paper we present clear evidence for the observation of the {ital L}{prime}{sup 2}{Phi} electronic state, showing a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub {ital r}}{r_arrow}{sup 2}{Phi} excitation transitionmore » in an electron-scattering experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}« less
  • Collisional quenching cross sections for laser-induced fluorescence from NO [ital A]([ital v][prime]=0) are measured for H[sub 2]O, CO[sub 2], O[sub 2], NO, N[sub 2], H[sub 2], Ar, C[sub 2]H[sub 6], and CO as a function of temperature from 300 to 1750 K. Room temperature cross sections vary widely ([le]0.03 A[sup 2] for N[sub 2], H[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 6], and Ar to [ge]100 A[sup 2] for H[sub 2]O). As temperature increases, cross sections for H[sub 2]O and CO[sub 2] decrease, cross sections for O[sub 2] and NO remain constant, and cross sections for N[sub 2], H[sub 2], CO, and C[submore » 2]H[sub 6] increase. These data provide quantitative quenching corrections for laser-induced fluorescence measurements of NO concentrations in nonreacting and reacting flows. Physical quenching models (based upon NO--Q and NO[sup +]--Q[sup [minus]] collision complexes) are reviewed and used for experimental data correlation and extrapolation. A new quenching mechanism is proposed for weak quenchers.« less
  • This chapter is concerned with the determination of benchmark cross sections for electron scattering at low energies by the application of electron swarm techniques. Here we shall arbitrarily define a benchmark cross section as one that has been determined to within {+-}5%, and the low-energy regime as the energy range extending from about 10{sup -2} to 10eV. In order to place the contents of this chapter in context, we shall briefly compare the merits of three methods of determining cross sections in this energy range: time-of-flight absorption-cell techniques, high-resolution crossed-beam techniques, and the analysis of electron transport coefficients measured inmore » swarm experiments. 68 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.« less
  • We present a method of deriving energy and angle-dependent electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections from doubly differential cross sections for electron emission in ion-atom collisions. By analyzing the laboratory frame binary encounter electron production cross sections in energetic ion-atom collisions, we derive projectile frame differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from highly charged projectile ions in the range between 60{degree} and 180{degree}. The elastic scattering cross sections are observed to deviate strongly from the Rutherford cross sections for electron scattering from bare nuclei. They exhibit strong Ramsauer-Townsend electron diffraction in the angular distribution of elastically scattered electrons, providing evidencemore » for the strong role of screening played in the collision. Experimental data are compared with partial-wave calculations using the Hartree-Fock model. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}« less