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Title: tRNA modification profiles of the fast-proliferating cancer cells

Abstract

Despite the recent progress in RNA modification study, a comprehensive modification profile is still lacking for mammalian cells. Using a quantitative HPLC/MS/MS assay, we present here a study where RNA modifications are examined in term of the major RNA species. With paired slow- and fast-proliferating cell lines, distinct RNA modification profiles are first revealed for diverse RNA species. Compared to mRNAs, increased ribose and nucleobase modifications are shown for the highly-structured tRNAs and rRNAs, lending support to their contribution to the formation of high-order structures. This study also reveals a dynamic tRNA modification profile in the fast-proliferating cells. In addition to cultured cells, this unique tRNA profile has been further confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. Taken together, the results indicate that tRNA is a actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells, and suggest that they may play a more active role in biological process than expected. -- Highlights: •RNA modifications were first examined in term of the major RNA species. •A dynamic tRNA modifications was characterized for the fast-proliferating cells. •The unique tRNA profile was confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. •tRNA was predicted as an actively regulated RNA species inmore » the fast-proliferating cancer cells.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]; ; ;  [1]; ;  [3]; ;  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)
  2. Departmentof Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)
  3. Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology and Tumor Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22598790
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 476; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; CELL CULTURES; CELL PROLIFERATION; HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY; MESSENGER-RNA; MODIFICATIONS; NEOPLASMS; RIBOSE

Citation Formats

Dong, Chao, Niu, Leilei, Song, Wei, Xiong, Xin, Zhang, Xianhua, Zhang, Zhenxi, Yang, Yi, Yi, Fan, Zhan, Jun, Zhang, Hongquan, Yang, Zhenjun, Zhang, Li-He, Zhai, Suodi, Li, Hua, E-mail: huali88@sina.com, Ye, Min, E-mail: yemin@bjmu.edu.cn, and Du, Quan, E-mail: quan.du@pku.edu.cn. tRNA modification profiles of the fast-proliferating cancer cells. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.05.124.
Dong, Chao, Niu, Leilei, Song, Wei, Xiong, Xin, Zhang, Xianhua, Zhang, Zhenxi, Yang, Yi, Yi, Fan, Zhan, Jun, Zhang, Hongquan, Yang, Zhenjun, Zhang, Li-He, Zhai, Suodi, Li, Hua, E-mail: huali88@sina.com, Ye, Min, E-mail: yemin@bjmu.edu.cn, & Du, Quan, E-mail: quan.du@pku.edu.cn. tRNA modification profiles of the fast-proliferating cancer cells. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.05.124.
Dong, Chao, Niu, Leilei, Song, Wei, Xiong, Xin, Zhang, Xianhua, Zhang, Zhenxi, Yang, Yi, Yi, Fan, Zhan, Jun, Zhang, Hongquan, Yang, Zhenjun, Zhang, Li-He, Zhai, Suodi, Li, Hua, E-mail: huali88@sina.com, Ye, Min, E-mail: yemin@bjmu.edu.cn, and Du, Quan, E-mail: quan.du@pku.edu.cn. Fri . "tRNA modification profiles of the fast-proliferating cancer cells". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.05.124.
@article{osti_22598790,
title = {tRNA modification profiles of the fast-proliferating cancer cells},
author = {Dong, Chao and Niu, Leilei and Song, Wei and Xiong, Xin and Zhang, Xianhua and Zhang, Zhenxi and Yang, Yi and Yi, Fan and Zhan, Jun and Zhang, Hongquan and Yang, Zhenjun and Zhang, Li-He and Zhai, Suodi and Li, Hua, E-mail: huali88@sina.com and Ye, Min, E-mail: yemin@bjmu.edu.cn and Du, Quan, E-mail: quan.du@pku.edu.cn},
abstractNote = {Despite the recent progress in RNA modification study, a comprehensive modification profile is still lacking for mammalian cells. Using a quantitative HPLC/MS/MS assay, we present here a study where RNA modifications are examined in term of the major RNA species. With paired slow- and fast-proliferating cell lines, distinct RNA modification profiles are first revealed for diverse RNA species. Compared to mRNAs, increased ribose and nucleobase modifications are shown for the highly-structured tRNAs and rRNAs, lending support to their contribution to the formation of high-order structures. This study also reveals a dynamic tRNA modification profile in the fast-proliferating cells. In addition to cultured cells, this unique tRNA profile has been further confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. Taken together, the results indicate that tRNA is a actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells, and suggest that they may play a more active role in biological process than expected. -- Highlights: •RNA modifications were first examined in term of the major RNA species. •A dynamic tRNA modifications was characterized for the fast-proliferating cells. •The unique tRNA profile was confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. •tRNA was predicted as an actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2016.05.124},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 476,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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