skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: High energy X-ray pinhole imaging at the Z facility

Abstract

A new high photon energy (hν > 15 keV) time-integrated pinhole camera (TIPC) has been developed as a diagnostic instrument at the Z facility. This camera employs five pinholes in a linear array for recording five images at once onto an image plate detector. Each pinhole may be independently filtered to yield five different spectral responses. The pinhole array is fabricated from a 1-cm thick tungsten block and is available with either straight pinholes or conical pinholes. Each pinhole within the array block is 250 μm in diameter. The five pinholes are splayed with respect to each other such that they point to the same location in space, and hence present the same view of the radiation source at the Z facility. The fielding distance from the radiation source is 66 cm and the nominal image magnification is 0.374. Initial experimental results from TIPC are shown to illustrate the performance of the camera.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1190 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22597971
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CAMERAS; DISTANCE; FILTERS; IMAGES; KEV RANGE 10-100; PERFORMANCE; PHOTONS; PLATES; RADIATION SOURCES; SPECTRAL RESPONSE; TUNGSTEN; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

McPherson, L. Armon, Ampleford, David J., E-mail: damplef@sandia.gov, Coverdale, Christine A., Argo, Jeffrey W., Owen, Albert C., and Jaramillo, Deanna M. High energy X-ray pinhole imaging at the Z facility. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4953004.
McPherson, L. Armon, Ampleford, David J., E-mail: damplef@sandia.gov, Coverdale, Christine A., Argo, Jeffrey W., Owen, Albert C., & Jaramillo, Deanna M. High energy X-ray pinhole imaging at the Z facility. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953004.
McPherson, L. Armon, Ampleford, David J., E-mail: damplef@sandia.gov, Coverdale, Christine A., Argo, Jeffrey W., Owen, Albert C., and Jaramillo, Deanna M. 2016. "High energy X-ray pinhole imaging at the Z facility". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953004.
@article{osti_22597971,
title = {High energy X-ray pinhole imaging at the Z facility},
author = {McPherson, L. Armon and Ampleford, David J., E-mail: damplef@sandia.gov and Coverdale, Christine A. and Argo, Jeffrey W. and Owen, Albert C. and Jaramillo, Deanna M.},
abstractNote = {A new high photon energy (hν > 15 keV) time-integrated pinhole camera (TIPC) has been developed as a diagnostic instrument at the Z facility. This camera employs five pinholes in a linear array for recording five images at once onto an image plate detector. Each pinhole may be independently filtered to yield five different spectral responses. The pinhole array is fabricated from a 1-cm thick tungsten block and is available with either straight pinholes or conical pinholes. Each pinhole within the array block is 250 μm in diameter. The five pinholes are splayed with respect to each other such that they point to the same location in space, and hence present the same view of the radiation source at the Z facility. The fielding distance from the radiation source is 66 cm and the nominal image magnification is 0.374. Initial experimental results from TIPC are shown to illustrate the performance of the camera.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4953004},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 6,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • A new high photon energy (hv > 15 keV) time-integrated pinhole camera (TIPC) has become available at the Z facility for diagnostic applications. This camera employs five pinholes in a linear array for recording five images at once onto an image plate detector. Each pinhole may be independently filtered to yield five different spectral responses. The pinhole array is fabricated from a 1-cm thick tungsten block and is available with either straight pinholes or conical pinholes. Each pinhole within the array block is 250 μm in diameter. The five pinholes are splayed with respect to each other such that theymore » point to the same location in space, and hence present the same view of the target load at the Z facility. The fielding distance is 66 cm and the nominal image magnification is 0.374. Initial experimental results are shown to illustrate the performance of the camera.« less
  • Cited by 2
  • The origin and nature of the high-energy ions emitted by a discharge produced plasma source are studied using gated pinhole camera imaging. Time-of-flight analysis in combination with Faraday cup measurements enables characterization of the high-velocity component of the ionic debris. The use of an optional magnetic field allows mass-to-charge analysis of the first part of the Faraday cup signal. It is shown that this consists mainly of oxygen ions emitted from a region near the cathode. Time-resolved images of Sn ions with a kinetic energy of 45 keV visualize the regions in between the electrodes where the high-energy ion generationmore » takes place.« less
  • Here, pinhole imaging of large (mm scale) carbon-deuterium (CD) plasmas by proton self-emission has been used for the first time to study the microphysics of shock formation, which is of astrophysical relevance. The 3 MeV deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion proton self-emission from these plasmas is imaged using a novel pinhole imaging system, with up to five different 1 mm diameter pinholes positioned 25 cm from target-chamber center. CR39 is used as the detector medium, positioned at 100 cm distance from the pinhole for a magnification of 4×. A Wiener deconvolution algorithm is numerically demonstrated and used to interpret the images. Whenmore » the spatial morphology is known, this algorithm accurately reproduces the size of features larger than about half the pinhole diameter. For these astrophysical plasma experiments on the National Ignition Facility, this provides a strong constraint on simulation modeling of the experiment.« less