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Title: Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials

Abstract

An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [1];  [3]; ;  [4]
  1. Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004 (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)
  4. Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22597878
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; CARBON; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON DIOXIDE LASERS; CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERES; HEATING; KEV RANGE 10-100; NUCLEAR FUELS; OPTICAL PYROMETERS; SYNCHROTRONS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 1000-4000 K; URANIUM; URANIUM DIOXIDE; X RADIATION; ZIRCONIUM; ZIRCONIUM OXIDES

Citation Formats

Weber, J. K. R., Alderman, O. L. G., Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, Tamalonis, A., Sendelbach, S., Benmore, C. J., Hebden, A., and Williamson, M. A.. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955210.
Weber, J. K. R., Alderman, O. L. G., Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, Tamalonis, A., Sendelbach, S., Benmore, C. J., Hebden, A., & Williamson, M. A.. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955210.
Weber, J. K. R., Alderman, O. L. G., Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, Tamalonis, A., Sendelbach, S., Benmore, C. J., Hebden, A., and Williamson, M. A.. 2016. "Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955210.
@article{osti_22597878,
title = {Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials},
author = {Weber, J. K. R. and Alderman, O. L. G. and Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 and Tamalonis, A. and Sendelbach, S. and Benmore, C. J. and Hebden, A. and Williamson, M. A.},
abstractNote = {An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955210},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 7,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Cited by 3
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