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Title: Cooling rate dependence of structural order in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass

Abstract

The atomic structure of Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. By performing a long sub-T{sub g} annealing, we developed a glass model closer to the experiments than the models prepared by continuous cooling. Using the cluster alignment method, we found that “3661” cluster is the dominating short-range order in the glass samples. The connection and arrangement of “3661” clusters, which define the medium-range order in the system, are enhanced significantly in the sub-T{sub g} annealed sample as compared with the fast cooled glass samples. Unlike some strong binary glass formers such as Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5}, the clusters representing the short-range order do not form an interconnected interpenetrating network in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10,} which has only marginal glass formability.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [1];  [3];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [4]
  1. Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)
  2. (United States)
  3. Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)
  4. (ICQD), and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22597854
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 120; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ALIGNMENT; ALUMINIUM ALLOYS; ANNEALING; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COOLING; GLASS; METALLIC GLASSES; MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHOD; SAMARIUM ALLOYS

Citation Formats

Sun, Yang, Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011, Zhang, Yue, Zhang, Feng, E-mail: fzhang@ameslab.gov, Ye, Zhuo, Ding, Zejun, Wang, Cai-Zhuang, Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, Ho, Kai-Ming, Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011, Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, and International Center for Quantum Design of Functional Materials. Cooling rate dependence of structural order in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955223.
Sun, Yang, Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011, Zhang, Yue, Zhang, Feng, E-mail: fzhang@ameslab.gov, Ye, Zhuo, Ding, Zejun, Wang, Cai-Zhuang, Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, Ho, Kai-Ming, Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011, Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, & International Center for Quantum Design of Functional Materials. Cooling rate dependence of structural order in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955223.
Sun, Yang, Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011, Zhang, Yue, Zhang, Feng, E-mail: fzhang@ameslab.gov, Ye, Zhuo, Ding, Zejun, Wang, Cai-Zhuang, Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, Ho, Kai-Ming, Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011, Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, and International Center for Quantum Design of Functional Materials. 2016. "Cooling rate dependence of structural order in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955223.
@article{osti_22597854,
title = {Cooling rate dependence of structural order in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass},
author = {Sun, Yang and Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 and Zhang, Yue and Zhang, Feng, E-mail: fzhang@ameslab.gov and Ye, Zhuo and Ding, Zejun and Wang, Cai-Zhuang and Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 and Ho, Kai-Ming and Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 and Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 and International Center for Quantum Design of Functional Materials},
abstractNote = {The atomic structure of Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. By performing a long sub-T{sub g} annealing, we developed a glass model closer to the experiments than the models prepared by continuous cooling. Using the cluster alignment method, we found that “3661” cluster is the dominating short-range order in the glass samples. The connection and arrangement of “3661” clusters, which define the medium-range order in the system, are enhanced significantly in the sub-T{sub g} annealed sample as compared with the fast cooled glass samples. Unlike some strong binary glass formers such as Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5}, the clusters representing the short-range order do not form an interconnected interpenetrating network in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10,} which has only marginal glass formability.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955223},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 120,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Cited by 2
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