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Title: Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers

Abstract

A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Asylum Research, an Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States)
  2. Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22597837
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; AMPLITUDES; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CALIBRATION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DIAGRAMS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; FLEXIBILITY; SPECTRA

Citation Formats

Labuda, Aleksander, Kocun, Marta, Walsh, Tim, Meinhold, Jieh, Proksch, Tania, Meinhold, Waiman, Anderson, Caleb, Proksch, Roger, and Lysy, Martin. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955122.
Labuda, Aleksander, Kocun, Marta, Walsh, Tim, Meinhold, Jieh, Proksch, Tania, Meinhold, Waiman, Anderson, Caleb, Proksch, Roger, & Lysy, Martin. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955122.
Labuda, Aleksander, Kocun, Marta, Walsh, Tim, Meinhold, Jieh, Proksch, Tania, Meinhold, Waiman, Anderson, Caleb, Proksch, Roger, and Lysy, Martin. Fri . "Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955122.
@article{osti_22597837,
title = {Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers},
author = {Labuda, Aleksander and Kocun, Marta and Walsh, Tim and Meinhold, Jieh and Proksch, Tania and Meinhold, Waiman and Anderson, Caleb and Proksch, Roger and Lysy, Martin},
abstractNote = {A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955122},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 7,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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