skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

Abstract

Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the SALLE JAUNE terawatt laser at Laboratoire d’Optique Appliquée.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 Boulevard des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22597835
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ACCELERATION; ADDITIVES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DENSITY; DEPOSITION; DESIGN; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; INJECTION; JETS; LASERS; LAYERS; MANUFACTURING; NOZZLES; PLASMA GUNS; SINTERING; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Döpp, A., Guillaume, E., Thaury, C., Gautier, J., Ta Phuoc, K., and Malka, V. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4958649.
Döpp, A., Guillaume, E., Thaury, C., Gautier, J., Ta Phuoc, K., & Malka, V. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958649.
Döpp, A., Guillaume, E., Thaury, C., Gautier, J., Ta Phuoc, K., and Malka, V. Fri . "3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958649.
@article{osti_22597835,
title = {3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators},
author = {Döpp, A. and Guillaume, E. and Thaury, C. and Gautier, J. and Ta Phuoc, K. and Malka, V.},
abstractNote = {Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the SALLE JAUNE terawatt laser at Laboratoire d’Optique Appliquée.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4958649},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 7,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Traditional manufacturing of Inconel 718 components from castings and thermomechanical processing routes involve extensive post processing and machining to attain the desired geometry. Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies including direct energy deposition (DED), selective laser melting (SLM), electron beam melting (EBM) and binder jet 3D printing (BJ3DP) can minimize scrap generation and reduce lead times. While there is extensive literature on the use of melting and solidification based AM technologies, there has been limited research on the use of binder jet 3D printing. In this paper, a brief review on binder jet additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 is presented. In addition,more » existing knowledge on sintering of Inconel 718 has been extended to binder jet 3D printing. We found that supersolidus liquid phase sintering (SLPS) is necessary to achieve full densification of Inconel 718. SLPS is sensitive to the feedstock chemistry that has a strong influence on the liquid volume fraction at the processing temperature. Based on these results, we discuss an empirical framework to determine the role of powder particle size and liquid volume fraction on sintering kinetics. In conclusion, the role of powder packing factor and binder saturation on microstructural evolution is discussed. The current challenges in the use of BJ3DP for fabrication of Inconel 718, as well as, extension to other metal systems, are presented.« less
  • The influence of CF{sub 4} plasma treatment of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) and polyimide (PI) on the patterning of ink-jet printed polymer is presented. Not much difference between the as-received ITO and PI surface energies was found, but a significant difference in surface energies between ITO and PI after CF{sub 4} plasma treatment was noted. It is expected that precise patterning can be achieved by using the difference in surface energies between the inside of the pixel and its surroundings. Also the effects of CF{sub 4} plasma treatment of ITO have been studied on the performance of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs). X-raymore » photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that CF{sub 4} plasma treatment led to a decrease in the surface content of carbon contaminants and an increase in the surface content of fluorine, which in turn enhance the performance of PLEDs.« less
  • Recent interest in flexible electronics and wearable devices has created a demand for fast and highly repeatable printing processes suitable for device manufacturing. Robust printing technology is critical for the integration of sensors and other devices on flexible substrates such as paper and textile. An atmospheric pressure plasma-based printing process has been developed to deposit different types of nanomaterials on flexible substrates. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were deposited on paper to demonstrate site-selective deposition as well as direct printing without any type of patterning. Plasma-printed nanotubes were compared with non-plasma-printed samples under similar gas flow and other experimental conditions and foundmore » to be denser with higher conductivity. The utility of the nanotubes on the paper substrate as a biosensor and chemical sensor was demonstrated by the detection of dopamine, a neurotransmitter, and ammonia, respectively.« less
  • We report coupling and guiding of pulses of peak power up to 0.3 TW in 1.5-cm-long preformed plasma waveguides, generated in a high repetition rate argon gas jet. Coupling of up to 52{percent} was measured for 50-mJ, {approximately}110-fs pulses injected at times longer than 20 ns, giving guided intensities up to {approximately}5{times}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. For short delays between waveguide generation and pulse injection, pulse shortening occurred, with this effect reduced either by increasing delay or injecting a prepulse into the waveguide. There is excessive taper at the waveguide ends, which results from reduced heating at the ends of themore » jet by the waveguide generation pulse. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}« less