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Title: Bandgap measurements and the peculiar splitting of E{sub 2}{sup H} phonon modes of In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

Abstract

The dislocation free In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires (NWs) are grown on Si(111) by nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy in the temperature regime of 490 °C–610 °C yielding In composition ranges over 0.50 ≤ x ≤ 0.17. We study the optical properties of these NWs by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopies since they possesses minimal strain with reduced defects comparative to the planar films. The optical bandgap measurements of In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N NWs are demonstrated by SE where the absorption edges of the NW samples are evaluated irrespective of substrate transparency. A systematic Stoke shift of 0.04–0.27 eV with increasing x was observed when comparing the micro-photoluminescence spectra with the Tauc plot derived from SE. The micro-Raman spectra in the NWs with x = 0.5 showed two-mode behavior for A{sub 1}(LO) phonons and single mode behavior for E{sub 2}{sup H} phonons. As for x = 0.17, i.e., high Al content, we observed a peculiar E{sub 2}{sup H} phonon mode splitting. Further, we observe composition dependent frequency shifts. The 77 to 600 K micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements show that both AlN- and InN-like modes of A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}{sup H} phonons in In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N NWs are redshifted with increasing temperature, similar tomore » that of the binary III group nitride semiconductors. These studies of the optical properties of the technologically important In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires will path the way towards lasers and light-emitting diodes in the wavelength of the ultra-violet and visible range.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]; ; ;  [3]
  1. Photonics Laboratory, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)
  2. Adavanced nanofabrication Imaging and characterization, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)
  3. National Center for Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh 11442-6086 (Saudi Arabia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22597790
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 120; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ABSORPTION; ALUMINIUM NITRIDES; DEFECTS; DISLOCATIONS; ELLIPSOMETRY; FILMS; INDIUM NITRIDES; LIGHT EMITTING DIODES; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; MOLECULAR BEAMS; NANOWIRES; OPACITY; PHONONS; PHOTOLUMINESCENCE; PLASMA; RAMAN SPECTRA; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; RED SHIFT; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Tangi, Malleswararao, Mishra, Pawan, Janjua, Bilal, Ng, Tien Khee, Prabaswara, Aditya, Ooi, Boon S., E-mail: boon.ooi@kaust.edu.sa, Anjum, Dalaver H., Yang, Yang, Albadri, Abdulrahman M., Alyamani, Ahmed Y., and El-Desouki, Munir M. Bandgap measurements and the peculiar splitting of E{sub 2}{sup H} phonon modes of In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4959260.
Tangi, Malleswararao, Mishra, Pawan, Janjua, Bilal, Ng, Tien Khee, Prabaswara, Aditya, Ooi, Boon S., E-mail: boon.ooi@kaust.edu.sa, Anjum, Dalaver H., Yang, Yang, Albadri, Abdulrahman M., Alyamani, Ahmed Y., & El-Desouki, Munir M. Bandgap measurements and the peculiar splitting of E{sub 2}{sup H} phonon modes of In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959260.
Tangi, Malleswararao, Mishra, Pawan, Janjua, Bilal, Ng, Tien Khee, Prabaswara, Aditya, Ooi, Boon S., E-mail: boon.ooi@kaust.edu.sa, Anjum, Dalaver H., Yang, Yang, Albadri, Abdulrahman M., Alyamani, Ahmed Y., and El-Desouki, Munir M. 2016. "Bandgap measurements and the peculiar splitting of E{sub 2}{sup H} phonon modes of In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959260.
@article{osti_22597790,
title = {Bandgap measurements and the peculiar splitting of E{sub 2}{sup H} phonon modes of In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy},
author = {Tangi, Malleswararao and Mishra, Pawan and Janjua, Bilal and Ng, Tien Khee and Prabaswara, Aditya and Ooi, Boon S., E-mail: boon.ooi@kaust.edu.sa and Anjum, Dalaver H. and Yang, Yang and Albadri, Abdulrahman M. and Alyamani, Ahmed Y. and El-Desouki, Munir M.},
abstractNote = {The dislocation free In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires (NWs) are grown on Si(111) by nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy in the temperature regime of 490 °C–610 °C yielding In composition ranges over 0.50 ≤ x ≤ 0.17. We study the optical properties of these NWs by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopies since they possesses minimal strain with reduced defects comparative to the planar films. The optical bandgap measurements of In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N NWs are demonstrated by SE where the absorption edges of the NW samples are evaluated irrespective of substrate transparency. A systematic Stoke shift of 0.04–0.27 eV with increasing x was observed when comparing the micro-photoluminescence spectra with the Tauc plot derived from SE. The micro-Raman spectra in the NWs with x = 0.5 showed two-mode behavior for A{sub 1}(LO) phonons and single mode behavior for E{sub 2}{sup H} phonons. As for x = 0.17, i.e., high Al content, we observed a peculiar E{sub 2}{sup H} phonon mode splitting. Further, we observe composition dependent frequency shifts. The 77 to 600 K micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements show that both AlN- and InN-like modes of A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}{sup H} phonons in In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N NWs are redshifted with increasing temperature, similar to that of the binary III group nitride semiconductors. These studies of the optical properties of the technologically important In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N nanowires will path the way towards lasers and light-emitting diodes in the wavelength of the ultra-violet and visible range.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4959260},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 120,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films with Mg concentrations 0{<=}x{<=}0.3 were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane sapphire substrates. Precise determination of the Mg concentration x was performed by elastic recoil detection analysis. The bandgap energy was extracted from absorption measurements with high accuracy taking electron-hole interaction and exciton-phonon complexes into account. From these results a linear relationship between bandgap energy and Mg concentration is established for x{<=}0.3. Due to alloy disorder, the increase of the photoluminescence emission energy with Mg concentration is less pronounced. An analysis of the lattice parameters reveals that the epitaxial films grow biaxially strainedmore » on a-plane sapphire.« less
  • Analysis of steady-state and transient photoconductivity measurements at room temperature performed on c-axis oriented GaN nanowires yielded estimates of free carrier concentration, drift mobility, surface band bending, and surface capture coefficient for electrons. Samples grown (unintentionally n-type) by nitrogen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy primarily from two separate growth runs were examined. The results revealed carrier concentration in the range of (3-6)x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} for one growth run, roughly 5x10{sup 14}-1x10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} for the second, and drift mobility in the range of 500-700 cm{sup 2}/(V s) for both. Nanowires were dispersed onto insulating substrates and contacted forming single-wire, two-terminalmore » structures with typical electrode gaps of {approx_equal}3-5 {mu}m. When biased at 1 V bias and illuminated at 360 nm (3.6 mW/cm{sup 2}) the thinner ({approx_equal}100 nm diameter) nanowires with the higher background doping showed an abrupt increase in photocurrent from 5 pA (noise level) to 0.1-1 {mu}A. Under the same conditions, thicker (151-320 nm) nanowires showed roughly ten times more photocurrent, with dark currents ranging from 2 nA to 1 {mu}A. With the light blocked, the dark current was restored in a few minutes for the thinner samples and an hour or more for the thicker ones. The samples with lower carrier concentration showed similar trends. Excitation in the 360-550 nm range produced substantially weaker photocurrent with comparable decay rates. Nanowire photoconductivity arises from a reduction in the depletion layer via photogenerated holes drifting to the surface and compensating ionized surface acceptors. Simulations yielded (dark) surface band bending in the vicinity of 0.2-0.3 V and capture coefficient in the range of 10{sup -23}-10{sup -19} cm{sup 2}. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to conformally deposit {approx_equal}10 nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on several devices. Photoconductivity, persistent photoconductivity, and subgap photoconductivity of the coated nanowires were increased in all cases. TaN ALD coatings showed a reduced effect compared to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated samples.« less
  • Germanium doping of GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates is studied. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements reveal a constant Ge-concentration along the growth axis. A linear relationship between the applied Ge-flux and the resulting ensemble Ge-concentration with a maximum content of 3.3×10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} is extracted from energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements and confirmed by a systematic increase of the conductivity with Ge-concentration in single nanowire measurements. Photoluminescence analysis of nanowire ensembles and single nanowires reveals an exciton localization energy of 9.5 meV at the neutral Ge-donor. A Ge-related emission bandmore » at energies above 3.475 eV is found that is assigned to a Burstein-Moss shift of the excitonic emission.« less
  • Nucleation kinetics of GaN nanowires (NWs) by molecular beam epitaxy on amorphous Al{sub x}O{sub y} buffers deposited at low temperature by atomic layer deposition is analyzed. We found that the growth processes on a-Al{sub x}O{sub y} are very similar to those observed on standard Si(111) substrates, although the presence of the buffer significantly enhances nucleation rate of GaN NWs, which we attribute to a microstructure of the buffer. The nucleation rate was studied vs. the growth temperature in the range of 720–790 °C, which allowed determination of nucleation energy of the NWs on a-Al{sub x}O{sub y} equal to 6 eV. Thismore » value is smaller than 10.2 eV we found under the same conditions on nitridized Si(111) substrates. Optical properties of GaN NWs on a-Al{sub x}O{sub y} are analyzed as a function of the growth temperature and compared with those on Si(111) substrates. A significant increase of photoluminescence intensity and much longer PL decay times, close to those on silicon substrates, are found for NWs grown at the highest temperature proving their high quality. The samples grown at high temperature have very narrow PL lines. This allowed observation that positions of donor-bound exciton PL line in the NWs grown on a-Al{sub x}O{sub y} are regularly lower than in samples grown directly on silicon suggesting that oxygen, instead of silicon, is the dominant donor. Moreover, PL spectra suggest that total concentration of donors in GaN NWs grown on a-Al{sub x}O{sub y} is lower than in those grown under similar conditions on bare Si. This shows that the a-Al{sub x}O{sub y} buffer efficiently acts as a barrier preventing uptake of silicon from the substrate to GaN.« less
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