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Title: Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

Abstract

A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)
  2. (United Kingdom)
  3. AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)
  4. VACGEN Ltd, St. Leonards-On-Sea, East Sussex TN38 9NN (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22597759
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2016 Crown; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; APERTURES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DESORPTION; MASS SPECTROMETERS; MOLECULAR BEAMS; PERFORMANCE; RESOLUTION; SCATTERING; SIGNALS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE

Citation Formats

Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk, AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR, Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk, King, Martin O., Kerherve, Gwilherm, and Watts, John F. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960083.
Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk, AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR, Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk, King, Martin O., Kerherve, Gwilherm, & Watts, John F. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960083.
Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk, AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR, Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk, King, Martin O., Kerherve, Gwilherm, and Watts, John F. 2016. "Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960083.
@article{osti_22597759,
title = {Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments},
author = {Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk and AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR and Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk and King, Martin O. and Kerherve, Gwilherm and Watts, John F.},
abstractNote = {A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960083},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 8,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
  • Propylene and 1-butene were adsorbed at room temperature on cadmium molybdate, a poorly selective catalyst for olefin oxidation Temperature-programed desorption occurred at low temperature (145/sup 0/C for propylene, 100/sup 0/C for butene) from a reversibly adsorbed species on A sites, and at high temperature (400/sup 0/C for both olefins) from B sites in dissociated form. The A-sites were apparently vacancies or surface defects, which were destroyed when the cata
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