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Title: Hyperthermia with rotating magnetic nanowires inducing heat into tumor by fluid friction

Abstract

A magnetic hyperthermia cancer treatment strategy that does not operate by means of conventional heating mechanisms is presented. The proposed approach consists of injecting a gel with homogeneously distributed magnetic nanowires into a tumor. Upon the application of a low-frequency rotating or circularly polarized magnetic field, nanowires spin around their center of viscous drag due to torque generated by shape anisotropy. As a result of external rotational forcing and fluid friction in the nanoparticle's boundary layer, heating occurs. The nanowire dynamics is theoretically and experimentally investigated, and different feasibility proofs of the principle by physical modeling, which adhere to medical guidelines, are presented. The magnetic nanorotors exhibit rotations and oscillations with quite a steady center of gravity, which proves an immobile behavior and guarantees a time-independent homogeneity of the spatial particle distribution in the tumor. Furthermore, a fluid dynamic and thermodynamic heating model is briefly introduced. This model is a generalization of Penne's model that for this method reveals theoretic heating rates that are sufficiently high, and fits well into medical limits defined by present standards.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ; ; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Institute of Thermal Sciences and Engineering, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, CH 1401 Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland)
  2. Multi-Scale Robotics Lab, Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH Zurich, CH 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)
  3. Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), EPFL Fribourg, CH 1701 Fribourg (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22597701
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 120; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ANISOTROPY; BOUNDARY LAYERS; DISTRIBUTION; FLUIDS; FRICTION; GELS; GRAVITATION; HEAT; HEATING RATE; HYPERTHERMIA; MAGNETIC FIELDS; NANOPARTICLES; NANOWIRES; NEOPLASMS; ROTATION; SIMULATION; SPIN; TORQUE

Citation Formats

Egolf, Peter W., Pawlowski, Anne-Gabrielle, Tsague, Paulin, Marco, Bastien de, Bovy, William, Tucev, Sinisa, Shamsudhin, Naveen, E-mail: snaveen@ethz.ch, Pané, Salvador, Pokki, Juho, Ansari, M. H. D., Nelson, Bradley J., and Vuarnoz, Didier. Hyperthermia with rotating magnetic nanowires inducing heat into tumor by fluid friction. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960406.
Egolf, Peter W., Pawlowski, Anne-Gabrielle, Tsague, Paulin, Marco, Bastien de, Bovy, William, Tucev, Sinisa, Shamsudhin, Naveen, E-mail: snaveen@ethz.ch, Pané, Salvador, Pokki, Juho, Ansari, M. H. D., Nelson, Bradley J., & Vuarnoz, Didier. Hyperthermia with rotating magnetic nanowires inducing heat into tumor by fluid friction. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960406.
Egolf, Peter W., Pawlowski, Anne-Gabrielle, Tsague, Paulin, Marco, Bastien de, Bovy, William, Tucev, Sinisa, Shamsudhin, Naveen, E-mail: snaveen@ethz.ch, Pané, Salvador, Pokki, Juho, Ansari, M. H. D., Nelson, Bradley J., and Vuarnoz, Didier. 2016. "Hyperthermia with rotating magnetic nanowires inducing heat into tumor by fluid friction". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960406.
@article{osti_22597701,
title = {Hyperthermia with rotating magnetic nanowires inducing heat into tumor by fluid friction},
author = {Egolf, Peter W. and Pawlowski, Anne-Gabrielle and Tsague, Paulin and Marco, Bastien de and Bovy, William and Tucev, Sinisa and Shamsudhin, Naveen, E-mail: snaveen@ethz.ch and Pané, Salvador and Pokki, Juho and Ansari, M. H. D. and Nelson, Bradley J. and Vuarnoz, Didier},
abstractNote = {A magnetic hyperthermia cancer treatment strategy that does not operate by means of conventional heating mechanisms is presented. The proposed approach consists of injecting a gel with homogeneously distributed magnetic nanowires into a tumor. Upon the application of a low-frequency rotating or circularly polarized magnetic field, nanowires spin around their center of viscous drag due to torque generated by shape anisotropy. As a result of external rotational forcing and fluid friction in the nanoparticle's boundary layer, heating occurs. The nanowire dynamics is theoretically and experimentally investigated, and different feasibility proofs of the principle by physical modeling, which adhere to medical guidelines, are presented. The magnetic nanorotors exhibit rotations and oscillations with quite a steady center of gravity, which proves an immobile behavior and guarantees a time-independent homogeneity of the spatial particle distribution in the tumor. Furthermore, a fluid dynamic and thermodynamic heating model is briefly introduced. This model is a generalization of Penne's model that for this method reveals theoretic heating rates that are sufficiently high, and fits well into medical limits defined by present standards.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960406},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 120,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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