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Title: Second-order asymptotics for quantum hypothesis testing in settings beyond i.i.d.—quantum lattice systems and more

Abstract

Quantum Stein’s lemma is a cornerstone of quantum statistics and concerns the problem of correctly identifying a quantum state, given the knowledge that it is one of two specific states (ρ or σ). It was originally derived in the asymptotic i.i.d. setting, in which arbitrarily many (say, n) identical copies of the state (ρ{sup ⊗n} or σ{sup ⊗n}) are considered to be available. In this setting, the lemma states that, for any given upper bound on the probability α{sub n} of erroneously inferring the state to be σ, the probability β{sub n} of erroneously inferring the state to be ρ decays exponentially in n, with the rate of decay converging to the relative entropy of the two states. The second order asymptotics for quantum hypothesis testing, which establishes the speed of convergence of this rate of decay to its limiting value, was derived in the i.i.d. setting independently by Tomamichel and Hayashi, and Li. We extend this result to settings beyond i.i.d. Examples of these include Gibbs states of quantum spin systems (with finite-range, translation-invariant interactions) at high temperatures, and quasi-free states of fermionic lattice gases.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Statistical Laboratory, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB30WB (United Kingdom)
  2. Laboratoire de Mathématiques d’Orsay, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22596849
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Mathematical Physics; Journal Volume: 57; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ASYMPTOTIC SOLUTIONS; HYPOTHESIS; PROBABILITY; QUANTUM STATES

Citation Formats

Datta, Nilanjana, Rouzé, Cambyse, and Pautrat, Yan. Second-order asymptotics for quantum hypothesis testing in settings beyond i.i.d.—quantum lattice systems and more. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4953582.
Datta, Nilanjana, Rouzé, Cambyse, & Pautrat, Yan. Second-order asymptotics for quantum hypothesis testing in settings beyond i.i.d.—quantum lattice systems and more. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953582.
Datta, Nilanjana, Rouzé, Cambyse, and Pautrat, Yan. 2016. "Second-order asymptotics for quantum hypothesis testing in settings beyond i.i.d.—quantum lattice systems and more". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4953582.
@article{osti_22596849,
title = {Second-order asymptotics for quantum hypothesis testing in settings beyond i.i.d.—quantum lattice systems and more},
author = {Datta, Nilanjana and Rouzé, Cambyse and Pautrat, Yan},
abstractNote = {Quantum Stein’s lemma is a cornerstone of quantum statistics and concerns the problem of correctly identifying a quantum state, given the knowledge that it is one of two specific states (ρ or σ). It was originally derived in the asymptotic i.i.d. setting, in which arbitrarily many (say, n) identical copies of the state (ρ{sup ⊗n} or σ{sup ⊗n}) are considered to be available. In this setting, the lemma states that, for any given upper bound on the probability α{sub n} of erroneously inferring the state to be σ, the probability β{sub n} of erroneously inferring the state to be ρ decays exponentially in n, with the rate of decay converging to the relative entropy of the two states. The second order asymptotics for quantum hypothesis testing, which establishes the speed of convergence of this rate of decay to its limiting value, was derived in the i.i.d. setting independently by Tomamichel and Hayashi, and Li. We extend this result to settings beyond i.i.d. Examples of these include Gibbs states of quantum spin systems (with finite-range, translation-invariant interactions) at high temperatures, and quasi-free states of fermionic lattice gases.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4953582},
journal = {Journal of Mathematical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 57,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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