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Title: Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles

Abstract

Micron-sized polymer particles with nanoscale metal coatings are essential in conductive adhesives for electronics assembly. The particles function in a compressed state in the adhesives. The link between mechanical properties and electrical conductivity is thus of the utmost importance in the formation of good electrical contact. A custom flat punch set-up based on nanoindentation has been developed to simultaneously deform and electrically probe individual particles. The set-up has a sufficiently low internal resistance to allow the measurement of sub-Ohm contact resistances. Additionally, the set-up can capture mechanical failure of the particles. Combining this data yields a fundamental understanding of contact behavior. We demonstrate that this method can clearly distinguish between particles of different sizes, with different thicknesses of metal coating, and different metallization schemes. The technique provides good repeatability and physical insight into the behavior of these particles that can guide adhesive design and the optimization of bonding processes.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway)
  2. (Norway)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22596830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 119; Journal Issue: 24; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ADHESIVES; BONDING; CAPTURE; COATINGS; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTRIC CONTACTS; FAILURES; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; METALS; NANOSTRUCTURES; OPTIMIZATION; PARTICLES; POLYMERS; THICKNESS

Citation Formats

Bazilchuk, Molly, Kristiansen, Helge, Conpart AS, Skjetten 2013, Pettersen, Sigurd Rolland, Zhang, Zhiliang, and He, Jianying, E-mail: jianying.he@ntnu.no. Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4954218.
Bazilchuk, Molly, Kristiansen, Helge, Conpart AS, Skjetten 2013, Pettersen, Sigurd Rolland, Zhang, Zhiliang, & He, Jianying, E-mail: jianying.he@ntnu.no. Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954218.
Bazilchuk, Molly, Kristiansen, Helge, Conpart AS, Skjetten 2013, Pettersen, Sigurd Rolland, Zhang, Zhiliang, and He, Jianying, E-mail: jianying.he@ntnu.no. Tue . "Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954218.
@article{osti_22596830,
title = {Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles},
author = {Bazilchuk, Molly and Kristiansen, Helge and Conpart AS, Skjetten 2013 and Pettersen, Sigurd Rolland and Zhang, Zhiliang and He, Jianying, E-mail: jianying.he@ntnu.no},
abstractNote = {Micron-sized polymer particles with nanoscale metal coatings are essential in conductive adhesives for electronics assembly. The particles function in a compressed state in the adhesives. The link between mechanical properties and electrical conductivity is thus of the utmost importance in the formation of good electrical contact. A custom flat punch set-up based on nanoindentation has been developed to simultaneously deform and electrically probe individual particles. The set-up has a sufficiently low internal resistance to allow the measurement of sub-Ohm contact resistances. Additionally, the set-up can capture mechanical failure of the particles. Combining this data yields a fundamental understanding of contact behavior. We demonstrate that this method can clearly distinguish between particles of different sizes, with different thicknesses of metal coating, and different metallization schemes. The technique provides good repeatability and physical insight into the behavior of these particles that can guide adhesive design and the optimization of bonding processes.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4954218},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 24,
volume = 119,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 28 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Jun 28 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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