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Title: Shift of optical absorption edge in SnO{sub 2} films with high concentrations of nitrogen grown by chemical vapor deposition

Abstract

The optical and electrical properties of n-type SnO{sub 2} films with high concentrations of nitrogen (SnO{sub 2}:N) grown by chemical vapor deposition are studied. The carrier concentration increases from 4.1 × 10{sup 18} to 3.9 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} and the absorption edge shifts from 4.26 to 4.08 eV with increasing NH{sub 3} flow rate. Typical Urbach tails were observed from the absorption spectra and the Urbach energy increases from 0.321 to 0.526 eV with increasing NH{sub 3} flow rate. An “effective” absorption edge of about 4.61 eV was obtained for all investigated samples from fitting the extrapolations of the Urbach tails. Burstein-Moss effect, electron-impurity, and electron-electron interactions are shown to play a minor role for the shift of the absorption edges in SnO{sub 2}:N thin films.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Gießen (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22596681
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 119; Journal Issue: 24; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ABSORPTION; ABSORPTION SPECTRA; ABUNDANCE; AMMONIA; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; CONCENTRATION RATIO; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; ELECTRON-ELECTRON INTERACTIONS; ELECTRONS; EXTRAPOLATION; FLOW RATE; IMPURITIES; NITROGEN; THIN FILMS; TIN OXIDES

Citation Formats

Jiang, Jie, E-mail: Jie.Jiang@exp1.physik.uni-giessen.de, Lu, Yinmei, Meyer, Bruno K., Hofmann, Detlev M., and Eickhoff, Martin. Shift of optical absorption edge in SnO{sub 2} films with high concentrations of nitrogen grown by chemical vapor deposition. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4954693.
Jiang, Jie, E-mail: Jie.Jiang@exp1.physik.uni-giessen.de, Lu, Yinmei, Meyer, Bruno K., Hofmann, Detlev M., & Eickhoff, Martin. Shift of optical absorption edge in SnO{sub 2} films with high concentrations of nitrogen grown by chemical vapor deposition. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954693.
Jiang, Jie, E-mail: Jie.Jiang@exp1.physik.uni-giessen.de, Lu, Yinmei, Meyer, Bruno K., Hofmann, Detlev M., and Eickhoff, Martin. Tue . "Shift of optical absorption edge in SnO{sub 2} films with high concentrations of nitrogen grown by chemical vapor deposition". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954693.
@article{osti_22596681,
title = {Shift of optical absorption edge in SnO{sub 2} films with high concentrations of nitrogen grown by chemical vapor deposition},
author = {Jiang, Jie, E-mail: Jie.Jiang@exp1.physik.uni-giessen.de and Lu, Yinmei and Meyer, Bruno K. and Hofmann, Detlev M. and Eickhoff, Martin},
abstractNote = {The optical and electrical properties of n-type SnO{sub 2} films with high concentrations of nitrogen (SnO{sub 2}:N) grown by chemical vapor deposition are studied. The carrier concentration increases from 4.1 × 10{sup 18} to 3.9 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} and the absorption edge shifts from 4.26 to 4.08 eV with increasing NH{sub 3} flow rate. Typical Urbach tails were observed from the absorption spectra and the Urbach energy increases from 0.321 to 0.526 eV with increasing NH{sub 3} flow rate. An “effective” absorption edge of about 4.61 eV was obtained for all investigated samples from fitting the extrapolations of the Urbach tails. Burstein-Moss effect, electron-impurity, and electron-electron interactions are shown to play a minor role for the shift of the absorption edges in SnO{sub 2}:N thin films.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4954693},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 24,
volume = 119,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 28 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Jun 28 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}