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Title: Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current

Abstract

The multi-step resistive switching (RS) behavior of a unipolar Pt/Li{sub 0.06}Zn{sub 0.94}O/Pt resistive random access memory (RRAM) device is investigated. It is found that the RRAM device exhibits normal, 2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors under different compliance currents. The transport mechanism within the device is investigated by means of current-voltage curves, in-situ transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect (normal RS behavior) or Li{sup +} ion diffusion (2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors) under high electric fields.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [1]; ;  [3];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)
  2. (China)
  3. Department of Electronic Engineering, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung 802, Taiwan (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22596644
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 119; Journal Issue: 24; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; COMPLIANCE; DIFFUSION; DOPED MATERIALS; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTRIC FIELDS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTROCHEMISTRY; EMISSION; IMPEDANCE; LITHIUM IONS; MEMORY DEVICES; RANDOMNESS; SPECTROSCOPY; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; TRANSPORT THEORY; ZINC OXIDES

Citation Formats

Lin, Chun-Cheng, Department of Mathematic and Physical Sciences, R.O.C. Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan, Tang, Jian-Fu, Su, Hsiu-Hsien, Hong, Cheng-Shong, Huang, Chih-Yu, Chu, Sheng-Yuan, E-mail: chusy@mail.ncku.edu.tw, and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan. Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955063.
Lin, Chun-Cheng, Department of Mathematic and Physical Sciences, R.O.C. Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan, Tang, Jian-Fu, Su, Hsiu-Hsien, Hong, Cheng-Shong, Huang, Chih-Yu, Chu, Sheng-Yuan, E-mail: chusy@mail.ncku.edu.tw, & Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan. Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955063.
Lin, Chun-Cheng, Department of Mathematic and Physical Sciences, R.O.C. Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan, Tang, Jian-Fu, Su, Hsiu-Hsien, Hong, Cheng-Shong, Huang, Chih-Yu, Chu, Sheng-Yuan, E-mail: chusy@mail.ncku.edu.tw, and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan. 2016. "Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955063.
@article{osti_22596644,
title = {Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current},
author = {Lin, Chun-Cheng and Department of Mathematic and Physical Sciences, R.O.C. Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan and Tang, Jian-Fu and Su, Hsiu-Hsien and Hong, Cheng-Shong and Huang, Chih-Yu and Chu, Sheng-Yuan, E-mail: chusy@mail.ncku.edu.tw and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan},
abstractNote = {The multi-step resistive switching (RS) behavior of a unipolar Pt/Li{sub 0.06}Zn{sub 0.94}O/Pt resistive random access memory (RRAM) device is investigated. It is found that the RRAM device exhibits normal, 2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors under different compliance currents. The transport mechanism within the device is investigated by means of current-voltage curves, in-situ transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect (normal RS behavior) or Li{sup +} ion diffusion (2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors) under high electric fields.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955063},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 24,
volume = 119,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • In this paper, we investigate the influence of the carbon content on the Cu-Te phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior in carbon alloyed Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4} based conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) cells. Carbon alloying of copper-tellurium inhibits the crystallization, while attractive switching behavior is preserved when using the material as Cu-supply layer in CBRAM cells. The phase formation is first investigated in a combinatorial way. With increasing carbon content, an enlargement of the temperature window in which the material stays amorphous was observed. Moreover, if crystalline phases are formed, subsequent phase transformations are inhibited. The electricalmore » switching behavior of memory cells with different carbon contents is then investigated by implementing them in 580 μm diameter dot TiN/Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4}-C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si memory cells. Reliable switching behavior is observed for carbon contents up to 40 at. %, with a resistive window of more than 2 orders of magnitude, whereas for 50 at. % carbon, a higher current in the off state and only a small resistive window are present after repeated cycling. This degradation can be ascribed to the higher thermal and lower drift contribution to the reset operation due to a lower Cu affinity towards the supply layer, leading cycle-after-cycle to an increasing amount of Cu in the switching layer, which contributes to the current. The thermal diffusion of Cu into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under annealing also gives an indication of the Cu affinity of the source layer. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to investigate this migration depth in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} before and after annealing, showing a higher Cu, Te, and C migration for high carbon contents.« less
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