skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Experimental validation of wireless communication with chaos

Abstract

The constraints of a wireless physical media, such as multi-path propagation and complex ambient noises, prevent information from being communicated at low bit error rate. Surprisingly, it has only recently been shown that, from a theoretical perspective, chaotic signals are optimal for communication. It maximises the receiver signal-to-noise performance, consequently minimizing the bit error rate. This work demonstrates numerically and experimentally that chaotic systems can in fact be used to create a reliable and efficient wireless communication system. Toward this goal, we propose an impulsive control method to generate chaotic wave signals that encode arbitrary binary information signals and an integration logic together with the match filter capable of decreasing the noise effect over a wireless channel. The experimental validation is conducted by inputting the signals generated by an electronic transmitting circuit to an electronic circuit that emulates a wireless channel, where the signals travel along three different paths. The output signal is decoded by an electronic receiver, after passing through a match filter.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Complex System Control and Intelligent Information Processing, Xian University of Technology, Xian 710048 (China)
  2. Institute for Complex System and Mathematical Biology, SUPA, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22596442
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chaos (Woodbury, N. Y.); Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 97 MATHEMATICAL METHODS AND COMPUTING; CHAOS THEORY; DATA TRANSMISSION; ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; FILTERS; NOISE; SIGNALS; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO

Citation Formats

Ren, Hai-Peng, Bai, Chao, Liu, Jian, Baptista, Murilo S., and Grebogi, Celso. Experimental validation of wireless communication with chaos. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960787.
Ren, Hai-Peng, Bai, Chao, Liu, Jian, Baptista, Murilo S., & Grebogi, Celso. Experimental validation of wireless communication with chaos. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960787.
Ren, Hai-Peng, Bai, Chao, Liu, Jian, Baptista, Murilo S., and Grebogi, Celso. Mon . "Experimental validation of wireless communication with chaos". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960787.
@article{osti_22596442,
title = {Experimental validation of wireless communication with chaos},
author = {Ren, Hai-Peng and Bai, Chao and Liu, Jian and Baptista, Murilo S. and Grebogi, Celso},
abstractNote = {The constraints of a wireless physical media, such as multi-path propagation and complex ambient noises, prevent information from being communicated at low bit error rate. Surprisingly, it has only recently been shown that, from a theoretical perspective, chaotic signals are optimal for communication. It maximises the receiver signal-to-noise performance, consequently minimizing the bit error rate. This work demonstrates numerically and experimentally that chaotic systems can in fact be used to create a reliable and efficient wireless communication system. Toward this goal, we propose an impulsive control method to generate chaotic wave signals that encode arbitrary binary information signals and an integration logic together with the match filter capable of decreasing the noise effect over a wireless channel. The experimental validation is conducted by inputting the signals generated by an electronic transmitting circuit to an electronic circuit that emulates a wireless channel, where the signals travel along three different paths. The output signal is decoded by an electronic receiver, after passing through a match filter.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960787},
journal = {Chaos (Woodbury, N. Y.)},
number = 8,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • The use of chaos to transmit information is demonstrated experimentally. The symbolic dynamics of a chaotic electrical oscillator is controlled to carry a prescribed message by use of extremely small perturbing current pulses.
  • Here we study the plausibility of a phase oscillators dynamical model for TDMA in wireless communication networks. We show that emerging patterns of phase locking states between oscillators can eventually oscillate in a round-robin schedule, in a similar way to models of pulse coupled oscillators designed to this end. The results open the door for new communication protocols in a continuous interacting networks of wireless communication devices.
  • Triple band microstrip tri-section bandpass filter using stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is designed, simulated, built, and measured using hair pin structure. The complete design procedure is given from analytical stage to implementation stage with details The coupling between SIRs is investigated for the first time in detail by studying their effect on the filter characteristics including bandwidth, and attenuation to optimize the filter perfomance. The simulation of the filler is performed using method of moment based 2.5D planar electromagnetic simulator The filter is then implemented on RO4003 material and measured The simulation, and measured results are compared and found tomore » be my close. The effect of coupling on the filter performance is then investigated using electromagnetic simulator It is shown that the coupling effect between SIRs can be used as a design knob to obtain a bandpass Idler with a better performance jar the desired frequency band using the proposed filter topology The results of this work can used in wireless communication systems where multiple frequency bandy are needed« less
  • Wireless networks are characterized by nodes mobility, which makes the propagation environment time-varying and subject to fading. As a consequence, the statistical characteristics of the received signal vary continuously, giving rise to a Doppler power spectral density (DPSD) that varies from one observation instant to the next. This paper is concerned with dynamical modeling of time-varying wireless fading channels, their estimation and parameter identification, and optimal power control from received signal measurement data. The wireless channel is characterized using a stochastic state-space form and derived by approximating the time-varying DPSD of the channel. The expected maximization and Kalman filter aremore » employed to recursively identify and estimate the channel parameters and states, respectively, from online received signal strength measured data. Moreover, we investigate a centralized optimal power control algorithm based on predictable strategies and employing the estimated channel parameters and states. The proposed models together with the estimation and power control algorithms are tested using experimental measurement data and the results are presented.« less
  • Timed-pregnant Fischer 344 rats (from nineteenth day of gestation) and their nursing offspring (until weaning) were exposed to a far-field 1.6 GHz Iridium wireless communication signal for 2 h/day, 5 days/week. Far-field whole-body exposures were conducted with a field intensity of 0.43 mW/cm 2 and whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.036 to 0.077 W/kg (0.10 to 0.22 W/kg in the brain). This was followed by chronic, head-only exposures of male and female offspring to a near-field 1.6 GHz signal for 2 h/day, 5 days/week, over 2 years. Near-field exposures were conducted at an SAR of 0.16 or 1.6more » W/kg in the brain. Concurrent sham-exposed and cage control rats were also included in the study. At the end of 2 years, all rats were necropsied. Bone marrow smears were examined for the extent of genotoxicity, assessed from the presence of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes. The results indicated that the incidence of micronuclei/ 2000 polychromatic erythrocytes were not significantly different between 1.6 GHz-exposed, sham-exposed and cage control rats. The group mean frequencies were 5.6 6 1.8 (130 rats exposed to 1.6 GHz at 0.16 W/kg SAR), 5.4 6 1.5 (135 rats exposed to 1.6 GHz at 1.6 W/kg SAR), 5.6 6 1.7 (119 sham-exposed rats), and 5.8 6 1.8 (100 cage control rats). In contrast, positive control rats treated with mitomycin C exhibited significantly elevated incidence of micronuclei/2000 polychromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow cells; the mean frequency was 38.2 6 7.0 (five rats). Thus there was no evidence for excess genotoxicity in rats that were chronically exposed to 1.6 GHz compared to sham-exposed and cage controls.« less