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Title: Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

Abstract

We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)
  2. (Singapore)
  3. Center for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22594432
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; BALANCES; COMPUTER CODES; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; EXTRACTION; FEEDBACK; FLUCTUATIONS; RANDOMNESS; SIGNALS; STREAMS

Citation Formats

Shi, Yicheng, Kurtsiefer, Christian, E-mail: christian.kurtsiefer@gmail.com, Center for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543, and Chng, Brenda. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4959887.
Shi, Yicheng, Kurtsiefer, Christian, E-mail: christian.kurtsiefer@gmail.com, Center for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543, & Chng, Brenda. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959887.
Shi, Yicheng, Kurtsiefer, Christian, E-mail: christian.kurtsiefer@gmail.com, Center for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543, and Chng, Brenda. Mon . "Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4959887.
@article{osti_22594432,
title = {Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations},
author = {Shi, Yicheng and Kurtsiefer, Christian, E-mail: christian.kurtsiefer@gmail.com and Center for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 and Chng, Brenda},
abstractNote = {We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4959887},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 4,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 25 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Jul 25 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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