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Title: Operation of a semiconductor microcavity under electric excitation

Abstract

We present a microscopic theory for the description of the bias-controlled operation of an exciton-polariton-based heterostructure, in particular, the polariton laser. Combining together the Poisson equations for the scalar electric potential and Fermi quasi-energies of electrons and holes in a semiconductor heterostructure, the Boltzmann equation for the incoherent excitonic reservoir and the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the exciton-polariton mean field, we simulate the dynamics of the system minimising the number of free parameters and build a theoretical threshold characteristic: number of particles vs applied bias. This approach, which also accounts for the nonlinear (exciton-exciton) interaction, particle lifetime, and which can, in principle, account for any relaxation mechanisms for the carriers of charge inside the heterostructure or polariton loss, allows to completely describe modern experiments on polariton transport and model devices.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, Joensuu FI-80101 (Finland)
  2. (Russian Federation)
  3. Center for Theoretical Physics of Complex Systems, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 34051 (Korea, Republic of)
  4. (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22594307
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BOLTZMANN EQUATION; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRONS; EXCITATION; HOLES; LASERS; MEAN-FIELD THEORY; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; OPERATION; PARTICLES; POISSON EQUATION; POLARONS; RELAXATION; SCALARS; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Karpov, D. V., ITMO University, St. Petersburg 197101, Savenko, I. G., and Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601. Operation of a semiconductor microcavity under electric excitation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4960797.
Karpov, D. V., ITMO University, St. Petersburg 197101, Savenko, I. G., & Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601. Operation of a semiconductor microcavity under electric excitation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960797.
Karpov, D. V., ITMO University, St. Petersburg 197101, Savenko, I. G., and Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601. 2016. "Operation of a semiconductor microcavity under electric excitation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4960797.
@article{osti_22594307,
title = {Operation of a semiconductor microcavity under electric excitation},
author = {Karpov, D. V. and ITMO University, St. Petersburg 197101 and Savenko, I. G. and Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601},
abstractNote = {We present a microscopic theory for the description of the bias-controlled operation of an exciton-polariton-based heterostructure, in particular, the polariton laser. Combining together the Poisson equations for the scalar electric potential and Fermi quasi-energies of electrons and holes in a semiconductor heterostructure, the Boltzmann equation for the incoherent excitonic reservoir and the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the exciton-polariton mean field, we simulate the dynamics of the system minimising the number of free parameters and build a theoretical threshold characteristic: number of particles vs applied bias. This approach, which also accounts for the nonlinear (exciton-exciton) interaction, particle lifetime, and which can, in principle, account for any relaxation mechanisms for the carriers of charge inside the heterostructure or polariton loss, allows to completely describe modern experiments on polariton transport and model devices.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4960797},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 6,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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