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Title: V{sub 3}O{sub 5}: Insulator-metal transition and electric-field-induced resistive-switching

Abstract

V{sub 3}O{sub 5} is one of the two vanadium oxides that exhibit insulator to metal transitions above room temperature. We report on the DC I–V characteristics of polycrystalline samples and single-crystals of V{sub 3}O{sub 5} over a wide range of currents. For all samples self-heating induced hysteretic nonlinear conductivity followed at higher currents by onset of negative differential resistivity regime, and finally, at highest currents, by switching to the metallic state. Slow switching towards a partially transformed state with a prolonged memory is typical of polycrystalline samples. High currents applied in the metallic state of one of the single crystals affected the oxygen content of the material and even caused appearance and disappearance of a VO{sub 2} inclusion. Simple and reproducible I–V plots were obtained for a single crystal with the currents that barely induced the metallic state.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Physics Department, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22594300
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTRIC FIELDS; HEATING; MONOCRYSTALS; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; OXYGEN; POLYCRYSTALS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; VANADIUM OXIDES

Citation Formats

Fisher, B., Patlagan, L., Chashka, K. B., Makarov, C., and Reisner, G. M. V{sub 3}O{sub 5}: Insulator-metal transition and electric-field-induced resistive-switching. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4962334.
Fisher, B., Patlagan, L., Chashka, K. B., Makarov, C., & Reisner, G. M. V{sub 3}O{sub 5}: Insulator-metal transition and electric-field-induced resistive-switching. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962334.
Fisher, B., Patlagan, L., Chashka, K. B., Makarov, C., and Reisner, G. M. 2016. "V{sub 3}O{sub 5}: Insulator-metal transition and electric-field-induced resistive-switching". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962334.
@article{osti_22594300,
title = {V{sub 3}O{sub 5}: Insulator-metal transition and electric-field-induced resistive-switching},
author = {Fisher, B. and Patlagan, L. and Chashka, K. B. and Makarov, C. and Reisner, G. M.},
abstractNote = {V{sub 3}O{sub 5} is one of the two vanadium oxides that exhibit insulator to metal transitions above room temperature. We report on the DC I–V characteristics of polycrystalline samples and single-crystals of V{sub 3}O{sub 5} over a wide range of currents. For all samples self-heating induced hysteretic nonlinear conductivity followed at higher currents by onset of negative differential resistivity regime, and finally, at highest currents, by switching to the metallic state. Slow switching towards a partially transformed state with a prolonged memory is typical of polycrystalline samples. High currents applied in the metallic state of one of the single crystals affected the oxygen content of the material and even caused appearance and disappearance of a VO{sub 2} inclusion. Simple and reproducible I–V plots were obtained for a single crystal with the currents that barely induced the metallic state.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4962334},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 10,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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