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Title: Room temperature ferroelectricity in continuous croconic acid thin films

Abstract

Ferroelectricity at room temperature has been demonstrated in nanometer-thin quasi 2D croconic acid thin films, by the polarization hysteresis loop measurements in macroscopic capacitor geometry, along with observation and manipulation of the nanoscale domain structure by piezoresponse force microscopy. The fabrication of continuous thin films of the hydrogen-bonded croconic acid was achieved by the suppression of the thermal decomposition using low evaporation temperatures in high vacuum, combined with growth conditions far from thermal equilibrium. For nominal coverages ≥20 nm, quasi 2D and polycrystalline films, with an average grain size of 50–100 nm and 3.5 nm roughness, can be obtained. Spontaneous ferroelectric domain structures of the thin films have been observed and appear to correlate with the grain patterns. The application of this solvent-free growth protocol may be a key to the development of flexible organic ferroelectric thin films for electronic applications.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [4]; ; ;  [1];  [5]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)
  2. (China)
  3. Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010 (United States)
  4. Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)
  5. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22594295
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CAPACITORS; DOMAIN STRUCTURE; EVAPORATION; FABRICATION; FERROELECTRIC MATERIALS; GEOMETRY; GRAIN SIZE; HYDROGEN; MICROSCOPY; NANOSTRUCTURES; POLARIZATION; POLYCRYSTALS; PYROLYSIS; ROUGHNESS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; THERMAL EQUILIBRIUM; THIN FILMS; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Jiang, Xuanyuan, Lu, Haidong, Yin, Yuewei, Ahmadi, Zahra, Costa, Paulo S., Zhang, Xiaozhe, Department of Physics, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Wang, Xiao, Yu, Le, Cheng, Xuemei, DiChiara, Anthony D., Gruverman, Alexei, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu, Enders, Axel, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu, Xu, Xiaoshan, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu, and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588. Room temperature ferroelectricity in continuous croconic acid thin films. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4962278.
Jiang, Xuanyuan, Lu, Haidong, Yin, Yuewei, Ahmadi, Zahra, Costa, Paulo S., Zhang, Xiaozhe, Department of Physics, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Wang, Xiao, Yu, Le, Cheng, Xuemei, DiChiara, Anthony D., Gruverman, Alexei, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu, Enders, Axel, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu, Xu, Xiaoshan, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu, & Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588. Room temperature ferroelectricity in continuous croconic acid thin films. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962278.
Jiang, Xuanyuan, Lu, Haidong, Yin, Yuewei, Ahmadi, Zahra, Costa, Paulo S., Zhang, Xiaozhe, Department of Physics, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Wang, Xiao, Yu, Le, Cheng, Xuemei, DiChiara, Anthony D., Gruverman, Alexei, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu, Enders, Axel, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu, Xu, Xiaoshan, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu, and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588. 2016. "Room temperature ferroelectricity in continuous croconic acid thin films". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962278.
@article{osti_22594295,
title = {Room temperature ferroelectricity in continuous croconic acid thin films},
author = {Jiang, Xuanyuan and Lu, Haidong and Yin, Yuewei and Ahmadi, Zahra and Costa, Paulo S. and Zhang, Xiaozhe and Department of Physics, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 and Wang, Xiao and Yu, Le and Cheng, Xuemei and DiChiara, Anthony D. and Gruverman, Alexei, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu and Enders, Axel, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu and Xu, Xiaoshan, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588},
abstractNote = {Ferroelectricity at room temperature has been demonstrated in nanometer-thin quasi 2D croconic acid thin films, by the polarization hysteresis loop measurements in macroscopic capacitor geometry, along with observation and manipulation of the nanoscale domain structure by piezoresponse force microscopy. The fabrication of continuous thin films of the hydrogen-bonded croconic acid was achieved by the suppression of the thermal decomposition using low evaporation temperatures in high vacuum, combined with growth conditions far from thermal equilibrium. For nominal coverages ≥20 nm, quasi 2D and polycrystalline films, with an average grain size of 50–100 nm and 3.5 nm roughness, can be obtained. Spontaneous ferroelectric domain structures of the thin films have been observed and appear to correlate with the grain patterns. The application of this solvent-free growth protocol may be a key to the development of flexible organic ferroelectric thin films for electronic applications.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4962278},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 10,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
  • In this study, highly strained films of BiFe 0.5Mn 0.5O 3 (BFMO) grown at very low rates by pulsed laser deposition were demonstrated to exhibit both ferrimagnetism and ferroelectricity at room temperature and above. Magnetization measurements demonstrated ferrimagnetism (T C ~ 600K), with a room temperature saturation moment (M S) of up to 90 emu/cc (~0.58μ B/f.u) on high quality (001) SrTiO 3. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism showed that the ferrimagnetism arose from antiferromagnetically coupled Fe 3+ and Mn 3+ . While scanning transmission electron microscope studies showed there was no long range ordering of Fe and Mn, the magneticmore » properties were found to be strongly dependent on the strain state in the films. The magnetism is explained to arise from one of three possible mechanisms with Bi polarization playing a key role. A signature of room temperature ferroelectricity in the films was measured by piezoresponse force microscopy and was confirmed using angular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The demonstration of strain induced, high temperature multiferroism is a promising development for future spintronic and memory applications at room temperature and above.« less
  • In this study, highly strained films of BiFe 0.5Mn 0.5O 3 (BFMO) grown at very low rates by pulsed laser deposition were demonstrated to exhibit both ferrimagnetism and ferroelectricity at room temperature and above. Magnetization measurements demonstrated ferrimagnetism (T C ~ 600K), with a room temperature saturation moment (M S) of up to 90 emu/cc (~0.58μ B/f.u) on high quality (001) SrTiO 3. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism showed that the ferrimagnetism arose from antiferromagnetically coupled Fe 3+ and Mn 3+ . While scanning transmission electron microscope studies showed there was no long range ordering of Fe and Mn, the magneticmore » properties were found to be strongly dependent on the strain state in the films. The magnetism is explained to arise from one of three possible mechanisms with Bi polarization playing a key role. A signature of room temperature ferroelectricity in the films was measured by piezoresponse force microscopy and was confirmed using angular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The demonstration of strain induced, high temperature multiferroism is a promising development for future spintronic and memory applications at room temperature and above.« less
  • The room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} is promising for oxide electronic devices controlled by multiple fields. An effective way to control the ferroelectricity is highly demanded. Here, we show that the off-centered antisite-like defects in SrTiO{sub 3} films epitaxially grown on Si (001) play the determinative role in the emergence of room-temperature ferroelectricity. The density of these defects changes with the film cation concentration sensitively, resulting in a varied coercive field of the ferroelectric behavior. Consequently, the room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} films can be effectively modulated by tuning the temperature of metal sources during the molecular beam epitaxy growth.more » Such an easy and reliable modulation of the ferroelectricity enables the flexible engineering of multifunctional oxide electronic devices.« less