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Title: Growth and structure of In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}Sb quantum dots on GaP(001)

Abstract

Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth of In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}Sb quantum dots (QDs) on GaP(001) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy is demonstrated. A thin GaAs interlayer prior to QD deposition enables QD nucleation. The impact of a short Sb-flush before supplying InGaSb is investigated. QD growth gets partially suppressed for GaAs interlayer thicknesses below 6 monolayers. QD densities vary from 5 × 10{sup 9} to 2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} depending on material deposition and Sb-flush time. When In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}Sb growth is carried out without Sb-flush, the QD density is generally decreased, and up to 60% larger QDs are obtained.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)
  2. Zentraleinrichtung Elektronenmikroskopie, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)
  3. Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22594292
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; DENSITY; DEPOSITION; GALLIUM ARSENIDES; GALLIUM PHOSPHIDES; INDIUM ANTIMONIDES; NUCLEATION; QUANTUM DOTS; THICKNESS; VAPOR PHASE EPITAXY; VAPORS

Citation Formats

Sala, E. M., Stracke, G., Schlichting, S., Nippert, F., Callsen, G., Strittmatter, A., Bimberg, D., Selve, S., Niermann, T., and Lehmann, M. Growth and structure of In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}Sb quantum dots on GaP(001). United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4962273.
Sala, E. M., Stracke, G., Schlichting, S., Nippert, F., Callsen, G., Strittmatter, A., Bimberg, D., Selve, S., Niermann, T., & Lehmann, M. Growth and structure of In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}Sb quantum dots on GaP(001). United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962273.
Sala, E. M., Stracke, G., Schlichting, S., Nippert, F., Callsen, G., Strittmatter, A., Bimberg, D., Selve, S., Niermann, T., and Lehmann, M. 2016. "Growth and structure of In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}Sb quantum dots on GaP(001)". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962273.
@article{osti_22594292,
title = {Growth and structure of In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}Sb quantum dots on GaP(001)},
author = {Sala, E. M. and Stracke, G. and Schlichting, S. and Nippert, F. and Callsen, G. and Strittmatter, A. and Bimberg, D. and Selve, S. and Niermann, T. and Lehmann, M.},
abstractNote = {Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth of In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}Sb quantum dots (QDs) on GaP(001) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy is demonstrated. A thin GaAs interlayer prior to QD deposition enables QD nucleation. The impact of a short Sb-flush before supplying InGaSb is investigated. QD growth gets partially suppressed for GaAs interlayer thicknesses below 6 monolayers. QD densities vary from 5 × 10{sup 9} to 2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} depending on material deposition and Sb-flush time. When In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}Sb growth is carried out without Sb-flush, the QD density is generally decreased, and up to 60% larger QDs are obtained.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4962273},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 10,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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