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Title: Application of nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation to titanium nasal implants with nanonetwork surface structure

Abstract

In nasal reconstruction, the response of cells to titanium (Ti) implants is mainly determined by surface features of the implant. In a pilot study, the authors applied electrochemical anodization to Ti surfaces in an alkaline solution to create a network of nanoscale surface structures. This nanonetwork was intended to enhance the responses of primary human nasal epithelial cell (HNEpC) to the Ti surface. In this study, the authors then treated the anodized, nanonetwork-structured Ti surface using nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (NPIII) in order to further improve the HNEpC response to the Ti surface. Subsequently, surface characterization was performed to elucidate morphology, roughness, wettability, and chemistry of specimens. Cytotoxicity, blood, and HNEpC responses were also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that NPIII treatment led to the formation of a noncytotoxic TiN-containing thin film (thickness <100 nm) on the electrochemically anodized Ti surface with a nanonetwork-structure. NPIII treatment was shown to improve blood clotting and the adhesion of platelets to the anodized Ti surface as well as the adhesion and proliferation of hNEpC. This research spreads our understanding of the fact that a TiN-containing thin film, produced using NPIII treatment, could be used to improve blood and HNEpC responses to anodized, nanonetwork-structured Ti surfacesmore » in nasal implant applications.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [1];  [6];  [6];  [6];  [6];  [6]
  1. Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)
  2. State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)
  3. State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)
  4. Division of Rhinology, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)
  5. Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China)
  6. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22592869
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, Vacuum, Surfaces and Films; Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Vacuum Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 42 ENGINEERING; ANODIZATION; BLOOD; ELECTROCHEMISTRY; HUMAN POPULATIONS; IMPLANTS; ION IMPLANTATION; MORPHOLOGY; NANOSTRUCTURES; NITROGEN; NOSE; PLASMA; ROUGHNESS; SURFACES; THICKNESS; THIN FILMS; TITANIUM; TITANIUM NITRIDES; WETTABILITY

Citation Formats

Sun, Ying-Sui, Yang, Wei-En, Zhang, Lan, Zhu, Hongqin, Lan, Ming-Ying, Lee, Sheng-Wei, Huang, Her-Hsiung, E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw, Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan, Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan, Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan, Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan, and Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan. Application of nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation to titanium nasal implants with nanonetwork surface structure. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1116/1.4953409.
Sun, Ying-Sui, Yang, Wei-En, Zhang, Lan, Zhu, Hongqin, Lan, Ming-Ying, Lee, Sheng-Wei, Huang, Her-Hsiung, E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw, Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan, Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan, Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan, Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan, & Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan. Application of nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation to titanium nasal implants with nanonetwork surface structure. United States. doi:10.1116/1.4953409.
Sun, Ying-Sui, Yang, Wei-En, Zhang, Lan, Zhu, Hongqin, Lan, Ming-Ying, Lee, Sheng-Wei, Huang, Her-Hsiung, E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw, Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan, Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan, Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan, Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan, and Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan. 2016. "Application of nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation to titanium nasal implants with nanonetwork surface structure". United States. doi:10.1116/1.4953409.
@article{osti_22592869,
title = {Application of nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation to titanium nasal implants with nanonetwork surface structure},
author = {Sun, Ying-Sui and Yang, Wei-En and Zhang, Lan and Zhu, Hongqin and Lan, Ming-Ying and Lee, Sheng-Wei and Huang, Her-Hsiung, E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw and Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan and Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan and Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan and Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan and Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan},
abstractNote = {In nasal reconstruction, the response of cells to titanium (Ti) implants is mainly determined by surface features of the implant. In a pilot study, the authors applied electrochemical anodization to Ti surfaces in an alkaline solution to create a network of nanoscale surface structures. This nanonetwork was intended to enhance the responses of primary human nasal epithelial cell (HNEpC) to the Ti surface. In this study, the authors then treated the anodized, nanonetwork-structured Ti surface using nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (NPIII) in order to further improve the HNEpC response to the Ti surface. Subsequently, surface characterization was performed to elucidate morphology, roughness, wettability, and chemistry of specimens. Cytotoxicity, blood, and HNEpC responses were also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that NPIII treatment led to the formation of a noncytotoxic TiN-containing thin film (thickness <100 nm) on the electrochemically anodized Ti surface with a nanonetwork-structure. NPIII treatment was shown to improve blood clotting and the adhesion of platelets to the anodized Ti surface as well as the adhesion and proliferation of hNEpC. This research spreads our understanding of the fact that a TiN-containing thin film, produced using NPIII treatment, could be used to improve blood and HNEpC responses to anodized, nanonetwork-structured Ti surfaces in nasal implant applications.},
doi = {10.1116/1.4953409},
journal = {Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, Vacuum, Surfaces and Films},
number = 4,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • The low nitrogen retained dose due to competition from oxygen coimplantation diminishes the efficacy of nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation in silicon. In this work, we aim at improving the nitrogen retained dose by using ammonia as a precursor. Ammonia is introduced into the nitrogen plasma during plasma immersion ion implantation of silicon to improve the nitrogen reactivity and reduce the competition from oxygen in the residual vacuum. Our x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy results indicate that the ammonia precursor can indeed improve the N retained dose effectively, and the hydrophilic properties of the surface change with differentmore » ammonia to nitrogen ratios.« less
  • A multiple-grid-particle-in-cell numerical method has been developed. This method uses grids of different cell sizes and details are needed in only one part of the simulation region and not others. Hence, there are fewer nodes in the simulation thereby reduced computational time without sacrificing details. In the multiple-grid system, a phenomenon is identified to arise at the interface between two grids and a half-cell weighting method is utilized to solve the weighting issue at the boundary. It is shown that the expression of the change of momentum has no weighting function. This method is employed to numerically simulate the plasmamore » immersion ion implantation process into a nickel titanium rod measuring 50 mm long and 4.8 mm in diameter used in orthopaedic surgery. To conduct more uniform implantation, the NiTi rod is elevated on the sample stage by a metal rod. The nitrogen implantation fluences and depth profiles are simulated and compared to experimental values determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.« less
  • Herein, we consider the potential application of plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) for treatment of polymer surfaces. This paper presents some experimental data for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) implanted with nitrogen using PIII process. This polymer is widely used in medical prosthesis and PIII treatment has revealed to be an ease and cheap way to improve the lifetime of prosthesis made with UHMWPE. Here we show the latest results for UHMWPE surface treatment obtained with the use of a high voltage pulser of 100kV/200A based on coaxial Blumlein technology.
  • Ion focusing in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation (EGD-PIII) of hydrogen into silicon affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity. The phenomenon and its effects are investigated experimentally and theoretically under different conditions and compared to those in nitrogen EGD-PIII. Consistent results are obtained from experiments and numerical simulation disclosing that the lower the plasma density, the more severe is the ion focusing effect. The influence of the negative high voltage on the ion focusing effect is small compared to that of the plasma density.
  • Owing to the nonconformal plasma sheath in plasma immersion ion implantation of a rod sample, the retained dose can vary significantly. The authors propose to improve the implant uniformity by introducing a metal mesh. The depth profiles obtained with and without the mesh are compared and the implantation temperature at various locations is evaluated indirectly by differential scanning calorimeter. Our results reveal that by using the metal mesh, the retained dose uniformity along the length is greatly improved and the effects of the implantation temperature on the localized mechanical properties of the implanted NiTi shape memory alloy rod are nearlymore » negligible.« less