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Title: RBS-channeling study of radiation damage in Ar{sup +} implanted CuInSe{sub 2} crystals

Abstract

Chalcopyrite solar cells are reported to have a high tolerance to irradiation by high energy electrons or ions, but the origin of this is not well understood. This work studies the evolution of damage in Ar{sup +}-bombarded CuInSe{sub 2} single crystal using Rutherford backscattering/channeling analysis. Ar{sup +} ions of 30 keV were implanted with doses in the range from 10{sup 12} to 3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} at room temperature. Implantation was found to create two layers of damage: (1) on the surface, caused by preferential sputtering of Se and Cu atoms; (2) at the layer of implanted Ar, possibly consisting of stacking faults and dislocation loops. The damage in the second layer was estimated to be less than 2% of the theoretical prediction suggesting efficient healing of primary implantation defects.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]; ;  [4];  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, SUPA, Strathclyde University, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)
  2. (Russian Federation)
  3. Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg 620002 (Russian Federation)
  4. Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, H.Cavid ave., 33, AZ-1143 Baku (Azerbaijan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22592834
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, Vacuum, Surfaces and Films; Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Vacuum Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ARGON IONS; ATOMS; CHALCOPYRITE; CHANNELING; COPPER; DAMAGE; DISLOCATIONS; ELECTRONS; HEALING; IRRADIATION; KEV RANGE 10-100; LAYERS; MONOCRYSTALS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RUTHERFORD BACKSCATTERING SPECTROSCOPY; SOLAR CELLS; SPUTTERING; STACKING FAULTS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K

Citation Formats

Yakushev, Michael V., E-mail: michael.yakushev@strath.ac.uk, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg 620002, Institute of Solid State Chemistry of the Urals Branch of RAS, Ekaterinburg 620990, Volkov, Vladimir A., Mursakulov, Niyazi N., Sabzaliyeva, Chimnaz E., and Martin, Robert W. RBS-channeling study of radiation damage in Ar{sup +} implanted CuInSe{sub 2} crystals. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1116/1.4961882.
Yakushev, Michael V., E-mail: michael.yakushev@strath.ac.uk, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg 620002, Institute of Solid State Chemistry of the Urals Branch of RAS, Ekaterinburg 620990, Volkov, Vladimir A., Mursakulov, Niyazi N., Sabzaliyeva, Chimnaz E., & Martin, Robert W. RBS-channeling study of radiation damage in Ar{sup +} implanted CuInSe{sub 2} crystals. United States. doi:10.1116/1.4961882.
Yakushev, Michael V., E-mail: michael.yakushev@strath.ac.uk, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg 620002, Institute of Solid State Chemistry of the Urals Branch of RAS, Ekaterinburg 620990, Volkov, Vladimir A., Mursakulov, Niyazi N., Sabzaliyeva, Chimnaz E., and Martin, Robert W. Thu . "RBS-channeling study of radiation damage in Ar{sup +} implanted CuInSe{sub 2} crystals". United States. doi:10.1116/1.4961882.
@article{osti_22592834,
title = {RBS-channeling study of radiation damage in Ar{sup +} implanted CuInSe{sub 2} crystals},
author = {Yakushev, Michael V., E-mail: michael.yakushev@strath.ac.uk and Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg 620002 and Institute of Solid State Chemistry of the Urals Branch of RAS, Ekaterinburg 620990 and Volkov, Vladimir A. and Mursakulov, Niyazi N. and Sabzaliyeva, Chimnaz E. and Martin, Robert W.},
abstractNote = {Chalcopyrite solar cells are reported to have a high tolerance to irradiation by high energy electrons or ions, but the origin of this is not well understood. This work studies the evolution of damage in Ar{sup +}-bombarded CuInSe{sub 2} single crystal using Rutherford backscattering/channeling analysis. Ar{sup +} ions of 30 keV were implanted with doses in the range from 10{sup 12} to 3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} at room temperature. Implantation was found to create two layers of damage: (1) on the surface, caused by preferential sputtering of Se and Cu atoms; (2) at the layer of implanted Ar, possibly consisting of stacking faults and dislocation loops. The damage in the second layer was estimated to be less than 2% of the theoretical prediction suggesting efficient healing of primary implantation defects.},
doi = {10.1116/1.4961882},
journal = {Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, Vacuum, Surfaces and Films},
number = 5,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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