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Title: Single crystal CVD diamond membranes for betavoltaic cells

Abstract

A single crystal diamond large area thin membrane was assembled as a p-doped/Intrinsic/Metal (PIM) structure and used in a betavoltaic configuration. When tested with a 20 keV electron beam from a high resolution scanning electron microscope, we measured an open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 1.85 V, a charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 98%, a fill-factor of 80%, and a total conversion efficiency of 9.4%. These parameters are inherently linked to the diamond membrane PIM structure that allows full device depletion even at 0 V and are among the highest reported up to now for any other material tested for betavoltaic devices. It enables to drive a high short-circuit current I{sub sc} up to 7.12 μA, to reach a maximum power P{sub max} of 10.48 μW, a remarkable value demonstrating the high-benefit of diamond for the realization of long-life radioisotope based micro-batteries.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, 91-191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590816
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 108; Journal Issue: 25; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BETAVOLTAIC CELLS; CHARGE COLLECTION; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; DIAMONDS; DOPED MATERIALS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRICAL FAULTS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRON SCANNING; EQUIPMENT; FILL FACTORS; KEV RANGE 10-100; MEMBRANES; MONOCRYSTALS; RADIOISOTOPES; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Delfaure, C., Pomorski, M., E-mail: michal.pomorski@cea.fr, Sanoit, J. de, Bergonzo, P., and Saada, S. Single crystal CVD diamond membranes for betavoltaic cells. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4954013.
Delfaure, C., Pomorski, M., E-mail: michal.pomorski@cea.fr, Sanoit, J. de, Bergonzo, P., & Saada, S. Single crystal CVD diamond membranes for betavoltaic cells. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954013.
Delfaure, C., Pomorski, M., E-mail: michal.pomorski@cea.fr, Sanoit, J. de, Bergonzo, P., and Saada, S. Mon . "Single crystal CVD diamond membranes for betavoltaic cells". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954013.
@article{osti_22590816,
title = {Single crystal CVD diamond membranes for betavoltaic cells},
author = {Delfaure, C. and Pomorski, M., E-mail: michal.pomorski@cea.fr and Sanoit, J. de and Bergonzo, P. and Saada, S.},
abstractNote = {A single crystal diamond large area thin membrane was assembled as a p-doped/Intrinsic/Metal (PIM) structure and used in a betavoltaic configuration. When tested with a 20 keV electron beam from a high resolution scanning electron microscope, we measured an open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 1.85 V, a charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 98%, a fill-factor of 80%, and a total conversion efficiency of 9.4%. These parameters are inherently linked to the diamond membrane PIM structure that allows full device depletion even at 0 V and are among the highest reported up to now for any other material tested for betavoltaic devices. It enables to drive a high short-circuit current I{sub sc} up to 7.12 μA, to reach a maximum power P{sub max} of 10.48 μW, a remarkable value demonstrating the high-benefit of diamond for the realization of long-life radioisotope based micro-batteries.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4954013},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 25,
volume = 108,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 20 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Jun 20 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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