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Title: Optimal laser wavelength for efficient laser power converter operation over temperature

Abstract

A temperature dependent modeling study is conducted on a GaAs laser power converter to identify the optimal incident laser wavelength for optical power transmission. Furthermore, the respective temperature dependent maximal conversion efficiencies in the radiative limit as well as in a practically achievable limit are presented. The model is based on the transfer matrix method coupled to a two-diode model, and is calibrated to experimental data of a GaAs photovoltaic device over laser irradiance and temperature. Since the laser wavelength does not strongly influence the open circuit voltage of the laser power converter, the optimal laser wavelength is determined to be in the range where the external quantum efficiency is maximal, but weighted by the photon flux of the laser.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590774
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 108; Journal Issue: 24; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; GALLIUM ARSENIDES; LASERS; PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECT; QUANTUM EFFICIENCY; RADIANT FLUX DENSITY; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TRANSFER MATRIX METHOD; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Höhn, O., E-mail: oliver.hoehn@ise.fraunhofer.de, Walker, A. W., Bett, A. W., and Helmers, H. Optimal laser wavelength for efficient laser power converter operation over temperature. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4954014.
Höhn, O., E-mail: oliver.hoehn@ise.fraunhofer.de, Walker, A. W., Bett, A. W., & Helmers, H. Optimal laser wavelength for efficient laser power converter operation over temperature. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954014.
Höhn, O., E-mail: oliver.hoehn@ise.fraunhofer.de, Walker, A. W., Bett, A. W., and Helmers, H. 2016. "Optimal laser wavelength for efficient laser power converter operation over temperature". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4954014.
@article{osti_22590774,
title = {Optimal laser wavelength for efficient laser power converter operation over temperature},
author = {Höhn, O., E-mail: oliver.hoehn@ise.fraunhofer.de and Walker, A. W. and Bett, A. W. and Helmers, H.},
abstractNote = {A temperature dependent modeling study is conducted on a GaAs laser power converter to identify the optimal incident laser wavelength for optical power transmission. Furthermore, the respective temperature dependent maximal conversion efficiencies in the radiative limit as well as in a practically achievable limit are presented. The model is based on the transfer matrix method coupled to a two-diode model, and is calibrated to experimental data of a GaAs photovoltaic device over laser irradiance and temperature. Since the laser wavelength does not strongly influence the open circuit voltage of the laser power converter, the optimal laser wavelength is determined to be in the range where the external quantum efficiency is maximal, but weighted by the photon flux of the laser.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4954014},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 24,
volume = 108,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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