skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Probing the thermal Hall effect using miniature capacitive strontium titanate thermometry

Abstract

The thermal Hall effect is the thermal analog of the electrical Hall effect. Rarely observed in normal metals, thermal Hall signals have been argued to be a key property for a number of strongly correlated materials, such as high temperature superconductors, correlated topological insulators, and quantum magnets. The observation of the thermal Hall effect requires precise measurement of temperature in intense magnetic fields. Particularly at low temperature, resistive thermometers have a strong dependence on field, which makes them unsuitable for this purpose. We have created capacitive thermometers which instead measure the dielectric constant of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}). SrTiO{sub 3} approaches a ferroelectric transition, causing its dielectric constant to increase by a few orders of magnitude at low temperature. As a result, these thermometers are very sensitive at low temperature while having very little dependence on the applied magnetic field, making them ideal for thermal Hall measurements. We demonstrate this method by making measurements of the thermal Hall effect in Bismuth in magnetic fields of up to 10 T.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590653
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 108; Journal Issue: 26; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BISMUTH; FERROELECTRIC MATERIALS; HALL EFFECT; HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTORS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETS; PERMITTIVITY; PROBES; SIGNALS; STRONTIUM TITANATES; THERMOMETERS; TOPOLOGY

Citation Formats

Tinsman, Colin, Li, Gang, Asaba, Tomoya, Lawson, Benjamin, Yu, Fan, Li, Lu, and Su, Caroline. Probing the thermal Hall effect using miniature capacitive strontium titanate thermometry. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955069.
Tinsman, Colin, Li, Gang, Asaba, Tomoya, Lawson, Benjamin, Yu, Fan, Li, Lu, & Su, Caroline. Probing the thermal Hall effect using miniature capacitive strontium titanate thermometry. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955069.
Tinsman, Colin, Li, Gang, Asaba, Tomoya, Lawson, Benjamin, Yu, Fan, Li, Lu, and Su, Caroline. Mon . "Probing the thermal Hall effect using miniature capacitive strontium titanate thermometry". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955069.
@article{osti_22590653,
title = {Probing the thermal Hall effect using miniature capacitive strontium titanate thermometry},
author = {Tinsman, Colin and Li, Gang and Asaba, Tomoya and Lawson, Benjamin and Yu, Fan and Li, Lu and Su, Caroline},
abstractNote = {The thermal Hall effect is the thermal analog of the electrical Hall effect. Rarely observed in normal metals, thermal Hall signals have been argued to be a key property for a number of strongly correlated materials, such as high temperature superconductors, correlated topological insulators, and quantum magnets. The observation of the thermal Hall effect requires precise measurement of temperature in intense magnetic fields. Particularly at low temperature, resistive thermometers have a strong dependence on field, which makes them unsuitable for this purpose. We have created capacitive thermometers which instead measure the dielectric constant of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}). SrTiO{sub 3} approaches a ferroelectric transition, causing its dielectric constant to increase by a few orders of magnitude at low temperature. As a result, these thermometers are very sensitive at low temperature while having very little dependence on the applied magnetic field, making them ideal for thermal Hall measurements. We demonstrate this method by making measurements of the thermal Hall effect in Bismuth in magnetic fields of up to 10 T.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955069},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 26,
volume = 108,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Jun 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}