skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Demonstration of periodic nanostructure formation with less ablation by double-pulse laser irradiation on titanium

Abstract

By pairing femtosecond laser pulses (duration ∼40 fs and central wavelength ∼810 nm) at an appropriate time interval, a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is formed with much less ablation than one formed with a single pulse. On a titanium plate, a pair of laser pulses with fluences of 70 and 140 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a rather large time interval (>10 ps) creates a LIPSS with an interspace of 600 nm, the same as that formed by a single pulse of 210 mJ/cm{sup 2}, while the double pulse ablates only 4 nm, a quarter of the ablation depth of a single pulse.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [1]; ; ; ;  [3];  [2]
  1. Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
  3. Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590626
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 108; Journal Issue: 26; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ABLATION; DEPTH; LASER RADIATION; LASERS; NANOSTRUCTURES; PERIODICITY; PLATES; PULSES; SURFACES; TITANIUM; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Furukawa, Yuki, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502, Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Sakata, Ryoichi, Konishi, Kazuki, Ono, Koki, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502, Matsuoka, Shusaku, Watanabe, Kota, Inoue, Shunsuke, Hashida, Masaki, Sakabe, Shuji, and Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011. Demonstration of periodic nanostructure formation with less ablation by double-pulse laser irradiation on titanium. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955035.
Furukawa, Yuki, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502, Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Sakata, Ryoichi, Konishi, Kazuki, Ono, Koki, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502, Matsuoka, Shusaku, Watanabe, Kota, Inoue, Shunsuke, Hashida, Masaki, Sakabe, Shuji, & Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011. Demonstration of periodic nanostructure formation with less ablation by double-pulse laser irradiation on titanium. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955035.
Furukawa, Yuki, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502, Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Sakata, Ryoichi, Konishi, Kazuki, Ono, Koki, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502, Matsuoka, Shusaku, Watanabe, Kota, Inoue, Shunsuke, Hashida, Masaki, Sakabe, Shuji, and Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011. 2016. "Demonstration of periodic nanostructure formation with less ablation by double-pulse laser irradiation on titanium". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955035.
@article{osti_22590626,
title = {Demonstration of periodic nanostructure formation with less ablation by double-pulse laser irradiation on titanium},
author = {Furukawa, Yuki and Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 and Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 and Sakata, Ryoichi and Konishi, Kazuki and Ono, Koki and Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 and Matsuoka, Shusaku and Watanabe, Kota and Inoue, Shunsuke and Hashida, Masaki and Sakabe, Shuji and Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011},
abstractNote = {By pairing femtosecond laser pulses (duration ∼40 fs and central wavelength ∼810 nm) at an appropriate time interval, a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is formed with much less ablation than one formed with a single pulse. On a titanium plate, a pair of laser pulses with fluences of 70 and 140 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a rather large time interval (>10 ps) creates a LIPSS with an interspace of 600 nm, the same as that formed by a single pulse of 210 mJ/cm{sup 2}, while the double pulse ablates only 4 nm, a quarter of the ablation depth of a single pulse.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955035},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 26,
volume = 108,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of fused silica with multiple irradiation sequences consisting of five Ti:sapphire femtosecond (fs) laser pulse pairs (150 fs, 800 nm) is studied experimentally. A Michelson interferometer is used to generate near-equal-energy double-pulse sequences with a temporal pulse delay from -20 to +20 ps between the cross-polarized individual fs-laser pulses ({approx}0.2 ps resolution). The results of multiple double-pulse irradiation sequences are characterized by means of Scanning Electron and Scanning Force Microscopy. Specifically in the sub-ps delay domain striking differences in the surface morphologies can be observed, indicating the importance of themore » laser-induced free-electron plasma in the conduction band of the solids for the formation of LIPSS.« less
  • The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of fused silica with multiple irradiation sequences consisting of laser pulse pairs (50 fs single-pulse duration) of two different wavelengths (400 and 800 nm) is studied experimentally. Parallel polarized double-pulse sequences with a variable delay Δt between −10 and +10 ps and between the individual fs-laser pulses were used to investigate the LIPSS periods versus Δt. These two-color experiments reveal the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition to the silica surface by the first laser pulse for LIPSS formation. The second laser pulse subsequently reinforces the previously seeded spatial LIPSSmore » frequencies.« less
  • Irradiation of a planar structure made of periodically spaced gold V antennas by a femtosecond pulsed laser has revealed several anomalously reflected and refracted waves, interpreted as diffraction maxima. Compression of the pulse spectrum in scattered light is observed. The degree of compression and wave polarisation are found to be determined by the scattering direction. (nanophotonics)
  • Surface pattering upon multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation is modeled by a non-linear-dynamic erosion/smoothing model, similar to structure formation during ion sputtering. The model is adopted to account for the influence of laser polarization on nanostructure features. Based on a nonlinear equation of the Kuramoto-Siavshinsky type, it is shown that the directional anisotropy in the pattern formation may result from a spatial anisotropy of the initial excitation/energy-coupling process, such as resonant coupling to surface plasmons/polaritons, or electron diffusion properties. Also, anisotropy of elasto-dynamic surface and diffusion properties may be involved. A comparison of numeric simulations based on the model with correspondingmore » experi-mental results gives a very good agreement.« less
  • Using a pump-probe technique the authors have measured reflectivity of diamondlike carbon (DLC) film irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses to understand dynamic processes responsible for periodic nanostructure formation. The results have shown that characteristic reflectivity change observed as a function of superimposed laser shots is closely associated with the nanostructure formation and the bonding structure change to induce surface swelling, leading to a conclusion that the nanostructure formation on the DLC surface is certainly preceded by the bonding structure change. The nanoscale ablation to produce the nanostructure is discussed based on the local field generation on the surface.