skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Stress compensation for arbitrary curvature control in vanadium dioxide phase transition actuators

Abstract

Due to its thermally driven structural phase transition, vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) has emerged as a promising material for micro/nano-actuators with superior volumetric work density, actuation amplitude, and repetition frequency. However, the high initial curvature of VO{sub 2} actuators severely obstructs the actuation performance and application. Here, we introduce a “seesaw” method of fabricating tri-layer cantilevers to compensate for the residual stress and realize nearly arbitrary curvature control of VO{sub 2} actuators. By simply adjusting the thicknesses of the individual layers, cantilevers with positive, zero, or negative curvatures can be engineered. The actuation amplitude can be decoupled from the curvature and controlled independently as well. Based on the experimentally measured residual stresses, we demonstrate sub-micron thick VO{sub 2} actuators with nearly zero final curvature and a high actuation amplitude simultaneously. This “seesaw” method can be further extended to the curvature engineering of other microelectromechanical system multi-layer structures where large stress-mismatch between layers are inevitable.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. (China)
  4. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)
  5. State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590610
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AMPLITUDES; CONTROL; DENSITY; LAYERS; MEMS; PERFORMANCE; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; RESIDUAL STRESSES; THICKNESS; VANADIUM OXIDES

Citation Formats

Dong, Kaichen, E-mail: dkc12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: wuj@berkeley.edu, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, Lou, Shuai, Choe, Hwan Sung, Yao, Jie, Wu, Junqiao, E-mail: dkc12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: wuj@berkeley.edu, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, Liu, Kai, and You, Zheng. Stress compensation for arbitrary curvature control in vanadium dioxide phase transition actuators. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4958692.
Dong, Kaichen, E-mail: dkc12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: wuj@berkeley.edu, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, Lou, Shuai, Choe, Hwan Sung, Yao, Jie, Wu, Junqiao, E-mail: dkc12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: wuj@berkeley.edu, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, Liu, Kai, & You, Zheng. Stress compensation for arbitrary curvature control in vanadium dioxide phase transition actuators. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958692.
Dong, Kaichen, E-mail: dkc12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: wuj@berkeley.edu, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, Lou, Shuai, Choe, Hwan Sung, Yao, Jie, Wu, Junqiao, E-mail: dkc12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: wuj@berkeley.edu, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, Liu, Kai, and You, Zheng. Mon . "Stress compensation for arbitrary curvature control in vanadium dioxide phase transition actuators". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958692.
@article{osti_22590610,
title = {Stress compensation for arbitrary curvature control in vanadium dioxide phase transition actuators},
author = {Dong, Kaichen, E-mail: dkc12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: wuj@berkeley.edu and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 and State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 and Lou, Shuai and Choe, Hwan Sung and Yao, Jie and Wu, Junqiao, E-mail: dkc12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: wuj@berkeley.edu and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 and Liu, Kai and You, Zheng},
abstractNote = {Due to its thermally driven structural phase transition, vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) has emerged as a promising material for micro/nano-actuators with superior volumetric work density, actuation amplitude, and repetition frequency. However, the high initial curvature of VO{sub 2} actuators severely obstructs the actuation performance and application. Here, we introduce a “seesaw” method of fabricating tri-layer cantilevers to compensate for the residual stress and realize nearly arbitrary curvature control of VO{sub 2} actuators. By simply adjusting the thicknesses of the individual layers, cantilevers with positive, zero, or negative curvatures can be engineered. The actuation amplitude can be decoupled from the curvature and controlled independently as well. Based on the experimentally measured residual stresses, we demonstrate sub-micron thick VO{sub 2} actuators with nearly zero final curvature and a high actuation amplitude simultaneously. This “seesaw” method can be further extended to the curvature engineering of other microelectromechanical system multi-layer structures where large stress-mismatch between layers are inevitable.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4958692},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 11 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Jul 11 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}