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Title: Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

Abstract

Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590593
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ACTIVATION ENERGY; CARBON NANOTUBES; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTRODES; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; INTERFACES; METALS; TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENT; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE

Citation Formats

Lee, Sang-Eui, Moon, Kyoung-Seok, and Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4958840.
Lee, Sang-Eui, Moon, Kyoung-Seok, & Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958840.
Lee, Sang-Eui, Moon, Kyoung-Seok, and Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com. 2016. "Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958840.
@article{osti_22590593,
title = {Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface},
author = {Lee, Sang-Eui and Moon, Kyoung-Seok and Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com},
abstractNote = {Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4958840},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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