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Title: Optimizing single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy by in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulses

Abstract

Single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy shows great application potential in super-resolution cell imaging. Here, we report in situ adaptive optimization of single-nanoparticle two-photon luminescence signals by phase and polarization modulations of broadband laser pulses. For polarization-independent quantum dots, phase-only optimization was carried out to compensate the phase dispersion at the focus of the objective. Enhancement of the two-photon excitation fluorescence intensity under dispersion-compensated femtosecond pulses was achieved. For polarization-dependent single gold nanorod, in situ polarization optimization resulted in further enhancement of two-photon photoluminescence intensity than phase-only optimization. The application of in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulse provides a way for object-oriented optimization of single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy for its future applications.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)
  2. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590586
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CONTROL; FLUORESCENCE; GOLD; LASERS; MICROSCOPY; MODULATION; NANOPARTICLES; OPTIMIZATION; PHOTOLUMINESCENCE; PHOTONS; POLARIZATION; PULSES; QUANTUM DOTS; RESOLUTION; SIGNALS

Citation Formats

Li, Donghai, Deng, Yongkai, Chu, Saisai, Jiang, Hongbing, Wang, Shufeng, E-mail: wangsf@pku.edu.cn, Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006, Gong, Qihuang, E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn, Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871. Optimizing single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy by in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulses. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4958617.
Li, Donghai, Deng, Yongkai, Chu, Saisai, Jiang, Hongbing, Wang, Shufeng, E-mail: wangsf@pku.edu.cn, Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006, Gong, Qihuang, E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn, Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006, & Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871. Optimizing single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy by in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulses. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958617.
Li, Donghai, Deng, Yongkai, Chu, Saisai, Jiang, Hongbing, Wang, Shufeng, E-mail: wangsf@pku.edu.cn, Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006, Gong, Qihuang, E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn, Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871. 2016. "Optimizing single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy by in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulses". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958617.
@article{osti_22590586,
title = {Optimizing single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy by in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulses},
author = {Li, Donghai and Deng, Yongkai and Chu, Saisai and Jiang, Hongbing and Wang, Shufeng, E-mail: wangsf@pku.edu.cn and Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 and Gong, Qihuang, E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn and Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871},
abstractNote = {Single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy shows great application potential in super-resolution cell imaging. Here, we report in situ adaptive optimization of single-nanoparticle two-photon luminescence signals by phase and polarization modulations of broadband laser pulses. For polarization-independent quantum dots, phase-only optimization was carried out to compensate the phase dispersion at the focus of the objective. Enhancement of the two-photon excitation fluorescence intensity under dispersion-compensated femtosecond pulses was achieved. For polarization-dependent single gold nanorod, in situ polarization optimization resulted in further enhancement of two-photon photoluminescence intensity than phase-only optimization. The application of in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulse provides a way for object-oriented optimization of single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy for its future applications.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4958617},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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