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Title: Real-time terahertz imaging through self-mixing in a quantum-cascade laser

Abstract

We report on a fast self-mixing approach for real-time, coherent terahertz imaging based on a quantum-cascade laser and a scanning mirror. Due to a fast deflection of the terahertz beam, images with frame rates up to several Hz are obtained, eventually limited by the mechanical inertia of the employed scanning mirror. A phase modulation technique allows for the separation of the amplitude and phase information without the necessity of parameter fitting routines. We further demonstrate the potential for transmission imaging.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [1]; ; ;  [3]
  1. Institute of Optical Sensor Systems, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)
  2. (Germany)
  3. Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Leibniz-Institut im Forschungsverbund Berlin e. V., Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590575
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AMPLITUDES; IMAGES; LASERS; MIRRORS; MODULATION; MOMENT OF INERTIA; TRANSMISSION

Citation Formats

Wienold, M., E-mail: martin.wienold@dlr.de, Rothbart, N., Hübers, H.-W., Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, 12489 Berlin, Hagelschuer, T., Schrottke, L., Biermann, K., and Grahn, H. T. Real-time terahertz imaging through self-mixing in a quantum-cascade laser. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955405.
Wienold, M., E-mail: martin.wienold@dlr.de, Rothbart, N., Hübers, H.-W., Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, 12489 Berlin, Hagelschuer, T., Schrottke, L., Biermann, K., & Grahn, H. T. Real-time terahertz imaging through self-mixing in a quantum-cascade laser. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955405.
Wienold, M., E-mail: martin.wienold@dlr.de, Rothbart, N., Hübers, H.-W., Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, 12489 Berlin, Hagelschuer, T., Schrottke, L., Biermann, K., and Grahn, H. T. 2016. "Real-time terahertz imaging through self-mixing in a quantum-cascade laser". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955405.
@article{osti_22590575,
title = {Real-time terahertz imaging through self-mixing in a quantum-cascade laser},
author = {Wienold, M., E-mail: martin.wienold@dlr.de and Rothbart, N. and Hübers, H.-W. and Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, 12489 Berlin and Hagelschuer, T. and Schrottke, L. and Biermann, K. and Grahn, H. T.},
abstractNote = {We report on a fast self-mixing approach for real-time, coherent terahertz imaging based on a quantum-cascade laser and a scanning mirror. Due to a fast deflection of the terahertz beam, images with frame rates up to several Hz are obtained, eventually limited by the mechanical inertia of the employed scanning mirror. A phase modulation technique allows for the separation of the amplitude and phase information without the necessity of parameter fitting routines. We further demonstrate the potential for transmission imaging.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955405},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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  • No abstract prepared.
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