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Title: Highly repeatable room temperature negative differential resistance in AlN/GaN resonant tunneling diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy

Abstract

AlN/GaN resonant tunneling diodes grown on low dislocation density semi-insulating bulk GaN substrates via plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy are reported. The devices were fabricated using a six mask level, fully isolated process. Stable room temperature negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed across the entire sample. The NDR exhibited no hysteresis, background light sensitivity, or degradation of any kind after more than 1000 continuous up-and-down voltage sweeps. The sample exhibited a ∼90% yield of operational devices which routinely displayed an average peak current density of 2.7 kA/cm{sup 2} and a peak-to-valley current ratio of ≈1.15 across different sizes.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)
  2. U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)
  3. Departments of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22590487
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2016 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ALUMINIUM NITRIDES; CURRENT DENSITY; DISLOCATIONS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; GALLIUM NITRIDES; HYSTERESIS; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; MOLECULAR BEAMS; PEAKS; PLASMA; SENSITIVITY; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; TUNNEL DIODES; TUNNEL EFFECT; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Growden, Tyler A., Fakhimi, Parastou, Berger, Paul R., E-mail: pberger@ieee.org, Storm, David F., Meyer, David J., Zhang, Weidong, and Brown, Elliott R. Highly repeatable room temperature negative differential resistance in AlN/GaN resonant tunneling diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4961442.
Growden, Tyler A., Fakhimi, Parastou, Berger, Paul R., E-mail: pberger@ieee.org, Storm, David F., Meyer, David J., Zhang, Weidong, & Brown, Elliott R. Highly repeatable room temperature negative differential resistance in AlN/GaN resonant tunneling diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961442.
Growden, Tyler A., Fakhimi, Parastou, Berger, Paul R., E-mail: pberger@ieee.org, Storm, David F., Meyer, David J., Zhang, Weidong, and Brown, Elliott R. 2016. "Highly repeatable room temperature negative differential resistance in AlN/GaN resonant tunneling diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961442.
@article{osti_22590487,
title = {Highly repeatable room temperature negative differential resistance in AlN/GaN resonant tunneling diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy},
author = {Growden, Tyler A. and Fakhimi, Parastou and Berger, Paul R., E-mail: pberger@ieee.org and Storm, David F. and Meyer, David J. and Zhang, Weidong and Brown, Elliott R.},
abstractNote = {AlN/GaN resonant tunneling diodes grown on low dislocation density semi-insulating bulk GaN substrates via plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy are reported. The devices were fabricated using a six mask level, fully isolated process. Stable room temperature negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed across the entire sample. The NDR exhibited no hysteresis, background light sensitivity, or degradation of any kind after more than 1000 continuous up-and-down voltage sweeps. The sample exhibited a ∼90% yield of operational devices which routinely displayed an average peak current density of 2.7 kA/cm{sup 2} and a peak-to-valley current ratio of ≈1.15 across different sizes.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4961442},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
  • This communication discusses the effects of substrate temperatures on tunneling peak current densities both during and after growth of GaAs tunneling junctions. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is the method used in this process. It also shows how thermal degradation is dependent upon doping concentrations. This degradation occurs because of high-temperature overgrowth in GaAs tunneling diodes grown by the MBE method. This communication also suggests some possible ways to minimize the thermal degradation of tunneling junctions, in order to obtain high conversion efficiency in multiple-junction solar cells.
  • We present current density-voltage characteristics of Ge quantum dot p{sup +}-i-n{sup +} tunneling diodes. The diode structure with Ge quantum dots embedded in the intrinsic region was grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy without any postgrowth annealing steps. The quantum dot diodes were fabricated using a low thermal budget fabrication process which preserves the Ge quantum structure. A negative differential resistance at room temperature of a Ge quantum dot tunneling diode was observed. A maximum peak to valley ratio of 1.6 at room temperature was achieved.
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