skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Sustainability as the key to prioritize investments in public infrastructures

Abstract

Infrastructure construction, one of the biggest driving forces of the economy nowadays, requires a huge analysis and clear transparency to decide what projects have to be executed with the few resources available. With the aim to provide the public administrations a tool with which they can make their decisions easier, the Sustainability Index of Infrastructure Projects (SIIP) has been defined, with a multi-criteria decision system called MIVES, in order to classify non-uniform investments. This index evaluates, in two inseparable stages, the contribution to the sustainable development of each infrastructure project, analyzing its social, environmental and economic impact. The result of the SIIP allows to decide the order with which projects will be prioritized. The case of study developed proves the adaptability and utility of this tool for the ordinary budget management.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Departament d'Enginyeria Civil i Ambiental, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya - Barcelona Tech. (Spain)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22589254
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 60; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CONSTRUCTION; DECISION MAKING; ECONOMIC IMPACT; GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT; OPERATING COST; SUSTAINABILITY; SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Citation Formats

Pardo-Bosch, Francesc, E-mail: francesc.pardo@upc.edu, Political Science Department, University of California - Berkeley, and Aguado, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.aguado@upc.edu. Sustainability as the key to prioritize investments in public infrastructures. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2016.03.007.
Pardo-Bosch, Francesc, E-mail: francesc.pardo@upc.edu, Political Science Department, University of California - Berkeley, & Aguado, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.aguado@upc.edu. Sustainability as the key to prioritize investments in public infrastructures. United States. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2016.03.007.
Pardo-Bosch, Francesc, E-mail: francesc.pardo@upc.edu, Political Science Department, University of California - Berkeley, and Aguado, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.aguado@upc.edu. 2016. "Sustainability as the key to prioritize investments in public infrastructures". United States. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2016.03.007.
@article{osti_22589254,
title = {Sustainability as the key to prioritize investments in public infrastructures},
author = {Pardo-Bosch, Francesc, E-mail: francesc.pardo@upc.edu and Political Science Department, University of California - Berkeley and Aguado, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.aguado@upc.edu},
abstractNote = {Infrastructure construction, one of the biggest driving forces of the economy nowadays, requires a huge analysis and clear transparency to decide what projects have to be executed with the few resources available. With the aim to provide the public administrations a tool with which they can make their decisions easier, the Sustainability Index of Infrastructure Projects (SIIP) has been defined, with a multi-criteria decision system called MIVES, in order to classify non-uniform investments. This index evaluates, in two inseparable stages, the contribution to the sustainable development of each infrastructure project, analyzing its social, environmental and economic impact. The result of the SIIP allows to decide the order with which projects will be prioritized. The case of study developed proves the adaptability and utility of this tool for the ordinary budget management.},
doi = {10.1016/J.EIAR.2016.03.007},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
number = ,
volume = 60,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
  • Concern about carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas has focused renewed attention on energy conservation because fossil fuel combustion is a major source of CO{sub 2} emissions. Since it is generally acknowledged that energy use could be significantly reduced through broader adoption of existing technologies, policy makers need to know how effective various policy instruments might be in accelerating the diffusion of these technologies. We examine the factors that determine the rate of diffusion, focusing on (1) potential market failures: information problems, principal-agent slippage, and unobserved costs, and (2) explanations that do not represent market failures: private information costs, highmore » discount rates, and heterogeneity among potential adopters. Through a series of simulations we explore how alternative policy instruments-both economic incentives and more conventional, direct regulations - could hasten the diffusion of energy-conserving technologies. 18 refs., 4 figs.« less
  • The goal of this study was to develop a policy maker's measure of sustainability which can be applied to new technologies or policies (T/P). The policy measure described here is comprised of three components: (1) a wastes measure (W) which provides an idea of the impact of the T/P's contribution towards the biophysical limits for the respective waste. (2) A Finite Energy Resources measure (FER) which provides an idea of the impact of the T/P's effect on US oil, gas and coal supplies. (3) A financial measure (F) which provides a measure of the financial cost of the energy frommore » the T/P. Each of these components, W, FER and F are compared to different benchmarks and are not tradable one against the other.« less
  • One of the fundamental challenges of project-based environmental assessments (EA) has been to deliver on the promise of meaningful public participation leading to decisions that put affected societies on the path to sustainability. The record to date has been less than promising, leading the authors to propose that it is time to consider a different approach to legislating public participation in project assessments, one that starts with the ultimate objective of cooperation and consensus building. The authors work back from this objective and propose an EA process specifically designed to encourage all participants to participate constructively. In the process, themore » authors identify how the proposed process will address various criticisms made of the traditional approach to EA by proponents, government officials and members of the public alike. Through a fundamental shift from process requirements to a focus on the outcomes of EA, the authors propose a way forward for project-based EA to deliver on the promise of becoming a central tool on the path to sustainability.« less
  • Sustainability theories in European Union (EU) development policies are facing significant challenges: it is difficult to transmit context-specific, publicly communicable messages; the recent development policies strengthen the concurrent development paradigm of economic growth and competitiveness; 'climate change' became a more popular environmental integration term than sustainability in the last few years. However, due to the recent crises of the economic growth, there is a great chance to reintroduce a sustainability-based development. A territorial/regional understanding of sustainability can also be an answer for the current challenges, a platform for refreshing the concept with relevant, specific messages that are close to themore » everyday life. This paper summarises the 'territorial system'-based basic principles of territorial sustainability in a model called AUTHARSIIV (AUTonomy, HARmony, Solidarity, Innovation, Identity and Values). This is a supplementary sustainability content specified for the context of spatial/regional development or planning. The paper also examines the presence of 'general and territorial sustainability' in regional development programmes, and case studies on applying the territorial sustainability principles in planning, assessment, and implementation. According to the results, sustainability is rarely adapted to the conditions of a given sector or a region, and the territorial aspect of sustainability is underrepresented even in territorial programmes. Therefore, the paper proposes a new planning and assessment system that is based on a set of regionally legitimate sustainability values.« less
  • The President s Climate Change Action Plan calls for the development of better science, data, and tools for climate preparedness. Many of the current questions about preparedness for extreme weather events in coming decades are, however, difficult to answer with assets that have been developed by climate science to answer longer-term questions about climate change. Capacities for projecting exposures to climate-related extreme events, along with their implications for interconnected infrastructures, are now emerging.