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Title: Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures

Abstract

This review article presents different fabrication procedures (under the headlines of solvothermal routes, aerosol methods, solution methods and thermolysis), and applications (photocatalytic degradation, ablation of cancer cells, electrode material in lithium ion batteries and in gas sensing, organic solar cells, field emission properties, super capacitor applications, photoelectrochemical performance of QDSCs, photocatalytic reduction of organic pollutants, electrochemical bio sensing, enhanced PEC characteristics of pre-annealed CuS film electrodes) of copper sulfide (Covellite). - Highlights: • This review article presents the synthesis and applications of copper sulfide. • CuS has been used over the years for different applications in nanoscience. • Different synthetic protocols are followed for their preparation which help in the possible modifications in the morphology of CuS.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22584101
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Solid State Chemistry; Journal Volume: 238; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; AEROSOLS; ANNEALING; CAPACITORS; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTRODES; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; ELECTRONS; FABRICATION; FIELD EMISSION; FILMS; LITHIUM ION BATTERIES; NANOSTRUCTURES; NEOPLASMS; ORGANIC SOLAR CELLS; PERFORMANCE; PHOTOCATALYSIS; SYNTHESIS; X RADIATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Shamraiz, Umair, E-mail: umairshamraiz@gmail.com, Hussain, Raja Azadar, E-mail: hussainazadar@gamil.com, and Badshah, Amin, E-mail: aminbadshah@yahoo.com. Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.JSSC.2016.02.046.
Shamraiz, Umair, E-mail: umairshamraiz@gmail.com, Hussain, Raja Azadar, E-mail: hussainazadar@gamil.com, & Badshah, Amin, E-mail: aminbadshah@yahoo.com. Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures. United States. doi:10.1016/J.JSSC.2016.02.046.
Shamraiz, Umair, E-mail: umairshamraiz@gmail.com, Hussain, Raja Azadar, E-mail: hussainazadar@gamil.com, and Badshah, Amin, E-mail: aminbadshah@yahoo.com. 2016. "Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures". United States. doi:10.1016/J.JSSC.2016.02.046.
@article{osti_22584101,
title = {Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures},
author = {Shamraiz, Umair, E-mail: umairshamraiz@gmail.com and Hussain, Raja Azadar, E-mail: hussainazadar@gamil.com and Badshah, Amin, E-mail: aminbadshah@yahoo.com},
abstractNote = {This review article presents different fabrication procedures (under the headlines of solvothermal routes, aerosol methods, solution methods and thermolysis), and applications (photocatalytic degradation, ablation of cancer cells, electrode material in lithium ion batteries and in gas sensing, organic solar cells, field emission properties, super capacitor applications, photoelectrochemical performance of QDSCs, photocatalytic reduction of organic pollutants, electrochemical bio sensing, enhanced PEC characteristics of pre-annealed CuS film electrodes) of copper sulfide (Covellite). - Highlights: • This review article presents the synthesis and applications of copper sulfide. • CuS has been used over the years for different applications in nanoscience. • Different synthetic protocols are followed for their preparation which help in the possible modifications in the morphology of CuS.},
doi = {10.1016/J.JSSC.2016.02.046},
journal = {Journal of Solid State Chemistry},
number = ,
volume = 238,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Covellite copper sulfide (CuS) micro/nanometer crystals in the shape of hierarchical doughnut-shaped, superstructured spheric-shaped and flowerlike architectures congregated from those nanoplates with the thickness of 20-100 nm have been prepared by a solvothermal method. The as-obtained CuS products were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A systematic investigation has been carried out to understand the factors influencing the evolution of CuS particle morphology which found to be predominant by solvent, surfactant, sulfur resource and copper salt. The possible formation mechanism for the nanostructure formation was also discussed. These CuS productsmore » show potential applications in solar cell, photothermal conversion and chemical sensor.« less
  • The electrical requirements of the CdS/Cu/sub x/S solar cell place severe requirements on the Cu/sub x/S stoichiometry. While using Cu--Ar--H/sub 2/S cylindrical magnetron reactive sputtering to deposit coatings for use in CdS/Cu/sub x/S solar cells, we encountered film property variations which were traced to relatively long time constants (approx.100 min) for equilibration of the cathode and wall surfaces. This paper describes experiments in which equilibration times were determined for cases where: (a) cathode and wall surfaces were initially both in a ''clean'' fresh copper state, (b) cathode was in the clean state and walls were in the conditioned state, andmore » (c) cathode was in the conditioned state and walls were in the clean state. The time constants were found to be determined primarily by the initial state of the cathode surface, the H/sub 2/S injection rate, and the discharge current. Heterojunctions with sputtered Cu/sub 2/S deposited after proper conditioning onto evaporated CdS and (CdZn)S have yielded short circuit currents approx.19 mA/cm/sup 2/ which are comparable to those obtained with copper sulfide deposited by the more conventional ion exchange processes. An efficiency of approx.7% has been achieved for a (CdZn)S/Cu/sub x/S cell with sputtered Cu/sub 2/S.« less
  • It is presented a detailed structural characterization of a nanostructured form of molybdenum disulfide. The material consists of a layer of highly textured molybdenum sulfide growing off a molybdenum dioxide core. The structure and chemical composition of the synthesized nanostructured sulfide was compared to two well-known forms of molybdenum disulfide, i.e. a commercial molybdenite sample and a poorly crystalline sulfide. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction showed that the material reported here presents crystalline nanodomains with a crystal structure corresponding to the 2H polytype of molybdenum disulfide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to demonstrate the differences between ourmore » sulfide and other materials such as amorphous MoS{sub 3}, oxysulfides and poorly crystalline MoS{sub 2}, corroborating the molybdenite-2H stacking in this form of sulfide. The material under study showed a high proportion of crystalline planes different from the basal plane.« less
  • Well-crystalline flower- and rod-like NiS nanostructures have been synthesized by an organic-free hydrothermal process at a low temperature of 200 deg. C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to characterize the as-synthesized NiS nanostructures. The effects of temperature and reaction time on the morphology have been also investigated. The two-step flake-cracking mechanism for the formation of flower- and rod-like NiS nanostructures was discussed. The products were also investigated by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy.
  • Silver bismuth sulfide (AgBiS{sub 2}) nanostructures were successfully prepared via a simple biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal synthesis at 200 Degree-Sign C for 12-72 h. Silver nitrate, bismuth nitrate and L-cysteine were used as starting materials. Here, the biomolecule, L-cysteine, was served as the sulfide source and a complexing agent. The products, characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), were cubic AgBiS{sub 2} nanoparticles with a diameter range of about 20-75 nm. It was found that their crystallinity and particle size increased with increasing reaction time. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and inductively coupledmore » plasma optical emission spectrophotometry (ICP-OES) analyses were used to confirm the stoichiometry of AgBiS{sub 2}. The optical band gap of the AgBiS{sub 2} nanoparticles, calculated from UV-vis spectra, was 3.0 eV which indicated a strong blue shift because of the quantum confinement effect. A possible formation mechanism of the AgBiS{sub 2} nanoparticles was also discussed. - Graphical abstract: The optical band gap of the as-prepared AgBiS{sub 2} nanoparticles displays a strong blue shift comparing to the 2.46 eV of bulk AgBiS{sub 2} caused by the quantum confinement effects. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal method is developed to prepare AgBiS{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Cysteine is served as the sulfide source and a complexing agent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase in band gap of the AgBiS{sub 2} nanoparticles attributes to the quantum confinement effects.« less